African Americans

Black-White Earnings Gap Returns to 1950 Levels

Patrick Bayer and Kerwin Kofi Charles
Science Blog
More and more working-age men in the United States aren’t working at all. The number of nonworking white men grew from about 8 percent in 1960 to 17 percent in 2014. The numbers look still worse among black men: In 1960, 19 percent of black men were not working; in 2014, that number had grown to 35 percent of black men. That includes men who are incarcerated as well those who can’t find jobs.

Slavery and Property: The Great Trap

Maya Jasanoff
New York Review of Books
As more and more settlers arrived in the English colonies, the property they owned north and south increasingly took the human form of African slaves, encouraging the credo that freedom for some required the enslavement of others. The books under review exhaustively cover the early slavery period, where even the Puritan ideal of a city on a hill actually rested on the backs of numerous enslaved and colonized people.

U.S. Owes Black People Reparations for a History of `Racial Terrorism,' Says U.N. Panel

Ishaan Tharoor
Washington Post
The legacy of colonial history, enslavement, racial subordination and segregation, racial terrorism and racial inequality in the United States remains a serious challenge, as there has been no real commitment to reparations and to truth and reconciliation for people of African descent, a United Nations report stated. "Contemporary police killings and the trauma that they create are reminiscent of the past racial terror of lynching."

Why Solidarity Between the Movement for Black Lives and Palestine Makes Sense

David Palumbo-Liu, Truthout News Analysis
Truthout
Critics of solidarity between the Movements for Black Lives and the Palestinian struggle miss how concepts like apartheid are not meant to apply only when there is perfect equivalence between two situations. They also apply when the experiences of two oppressed groups share common features.

Race and Beyond: Why Black Women’s Equal Pay Day Matters

Gabrielle Bozarth and Naomi Kellogg
Center for American Progress
"Black Women’s Equal Pay Day, which observes the amount of time it takes the average black woman to earn the same pay that the average white man earns in one calendar year." Black women only make 60 percent of what white male counterparts make. This is a clear example of the importance of race and gender in determining salary.

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