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Citizen Groups Will Sue DuPont

Sharon Lerner
The Intercept
Citizen Groups Will Sue DuPont and Chemours for Contaminating Drinking Water in North Carolina

Review: The House on Coco Road - A New View of Grenada’s Revolution

Joshua Jelly-Schapiro
New York Review of Books
Food, housing, health—is what the revolution fought for. A drowsy old sugar island whose slaves’ descendants were now mostly farmers and fisher-folk became vibrant with people crowding revolutionary rallies to dance and chant slogans that sounded like reggae songs and were affixed to brightly colored signs around the island: “Forward Ever, Backward Never”; “It takes a revolution, to make a solution”; “Not a second, without the people.”

UAW, Goddamn!

Joe Allen
Indypendent
A labor activist reflects on the United Autoworkers’ (UAW’s) crushing defeat at a Mississipi Nissan plant last week.

As Downtown Detroit Gentrifies, Longtime Black Residents Fight Illegal Tax Foreclosures

Bernadette Atuahene
DemocracyNow!
In Detroit, a recent study found that one in four Detroit properties have been subject to property tax foreclosure between 2011 and 2015—many of which may have been illegal. As downtown Detroit becomes increasingly gentrified, thousands of the city’s longtime residents—mostly African-American families—have lost their homes to foreclosure. For more, we speak with Bernadette Atuahene, a professor at Chicago-Kent College of Law at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

No more Hiroshimas! No More Nagasakis!

Jackie Cabasso
United for Peace & Justice
Listening to the testimonies of the aging A-bomb survivors (Hibakusha) and nuclear testing victims from the Marshall Islands and Australia, witnessing the emergence of new groups of in-vitro and 2 nd and 3 rd generation Hibakusha who are experiencing high levels of radiation-related health issues, one realizes with horror, that the 1945 atomic bombings are not a thing of the past, but an ongoing, still unfolding event.

Red Scare Redux 2017: From Right-Wing Radio to Brooklyn

Eleanor J. Bader
Truthout
Donald Trump's campaign and presidency have ushered in a tide of blatantly racist, classist, sexist and politically repressive nostalgia, encapsulated by his ominous slogan, "Make America Great Again." As Trump and his Republican allies work to dismantle civil, voting, reproductive and immigration rights, another vestige of the past -- anti-communism -- has begun to reappear.

Nutrition information abounds, but many doubt food choices

New Food Editors
New Food Magazine
According to the findings of the International Food Information Council Foundation’s 12th Annual Food and Health Survey, Americans are consuming food information from more sources than ever before, yet our nutritional literacy is sorely lacking – and our health may be suffering as a result.

What I’m Reading: An Interview with Eric Foner

Erik Moshe
History News Network
Ernest Renan, the 19th century French historian, said “the historian is the enemy of the nation.” I often ask students, what does he mean by that? What he’s saying is nations are built on myths, historical myths, and then the historian comes along and if he’s doing his job, shatters those myths, and often that makes the historian very unpopular. People like their myths but “myth” is not a good way of understanding how the society developed to where it is today.

How Do I Safely View A Solar Eclipse?

Xochitl Garcia / Illustration by Carrie Lapolla
Science Friday
On August 21, 2017, people across North America will be able to view either a total or partial solar eclipse. The last time most people in the U.S. were able to observe a total solar eclipse was 1991 and the next time won’t be until 2024! Here’s a guide to get you ready for the big event.

Organizers Say Quaint Baltimore Seafood Business Masks Shocking Labor Abuses

Bruce Vail
In These Times
The signature dish at its restaurants is the famed Maryland-style crab cake, and its dining rooms feature models of antique fishing boats and romanticized images of the bay watermen culture that is fading fast. But organizers say it’s mostly fake—a cover story for a rapacious, globalized business that preys on poor Indonesian women to extract rich profits for its U.S. owners.

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