Archives

For posts before June 2012, please follow these links to our archives.

Leave blank for all. Otherwise, the first selected term will be the default instead of "Any".
E.g., 2017-06-23

Media bits and bytes - Grab Bag Edition

Published by Portside
Don't Unlock Your Cellphone; Cable Soon to be Obsolete; Time-Warner Divorces Time Magazine; Minority Media Ownership Way Down; Hewlett Improves Conditions for its Chinese Workers; Amazon Polices Immigrant Workers with Neo-Nazi Guards; FCC Building Free Universal WiFi - Not!; Still No TV Cameras for SCOTUS; Technology & Democracy; Clicktivism & Unions; Journalists Under Attack; Zombies Hack Emergency Alert System; More

Growth of Income Inequality Blocks Recovery

JACK RAMUS
Talking Union
Growing income inequality—approaching now obscene levels—is not simply a ‘moral outrage’. It not only represents a gross violation of historically held American values or reasonable equality for all. It is a condition that has served, and continues to serve, as a major cause of the lack of sustained economic recovery in the US now for five years—as well as a major factor in explaining why the US continues today to drift toward another ‘double dip’ recession.

12 Ways the Sequester Will Screw the Poor

Erika Eichelberger
Mother Jones
The White House released a report Sunday emphasizing the ways in which the cuts will hurt the middle class, but although important entitlement programs such as Medicaid, Social Security, and food stamps are exempt from sequestration, many programs for low-income families are on the chopping block. Here are 12 of them:

Why we still need the Voting Rights Act

John Lewis
The Washington Post
This week the Supreme Court will hear one of the most important cases in our generation, Shelby County v. Holder. At issue is Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, which requires all or parts of 16 “covered” states with long histories and contemporary records of voting discrimination to seek approval from the federal government for voting changes.

‘Demographics’ Are Not Simply Passive Numbers, They Also Often Rise Up and Rebel

Bill Fletcher, Jr.
Progressive America Rising
What was most striking about the 2012 election, then, was that in the face of this attack on our right to vote, there was something akin to a popular revolt by the African American and Latino electorate. Latinos voted over 70% for Obama and African Americans over 93%. What happened in the 2012 election was very much about demographics. African Americans, Latinos and Asians turned out in significant numbers, voting overwhelmingly for the Democrats.

Obama Urged to Heed Warnings of 'Palestine on Fire'

Lauren McCauley
Common Dreams
In the wake of the death of detained Palestinian Arafat Jaradat, officials with the Palestinian Authority have issued a warning to President Obama that Palestine could be "on fire" during his upcoming visit to the region if he does not exert pressure on longtime ally Israel regarding the ongoing treatment of prisoners.

A Protest Resignation

Serena Golden
Inside Higher Ed
The eminent University of Chicago anthropologist Marshall Sahlins resigned from the National Academy of Sciences on Friday, citing his objections to its military partnerships and to its electing as a member Napoleon Chagnon, a long-controversial anthropologist who is back in the news thanks to the publication of his new book, Noble Savages.

What’s the Matter With Vermont?

Helena Rho
Slate
A pertussis vaccine became available in the 1940s, and incidence of the infection dropped from around 200,000 per year to barely over 1,000 by 1976. But today the United States is in the middle of a pertussis epidemic. The states with the most cases per capita are Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Vermont.

Oscar Nominee ‘The Invisible War’ Hits DC Hard

Patrick Gavin
Politico
Of the five documentaries nominated for the Academy Awards on Thursday, no film hits Washington more directly than “The Invisible War,” which looks at sexual assault in the U.S. military. It didn't win the Oscar Sunday night.

Palestinian Prisoners Stage Fast Over Inmate Death

BBC News
Thousands of Palestinian prisoners are refusing food for one day in protest at the death of a fellow detainee, Arafat Jaradat. Palestinians said an autopsy performed on Sunday revealed signs of torture. Mr Jaradat's death comes after a week of violent clashes between the Israeli army and Palestinian youths over the continued detention of four hunger strikers. The number of inmates on open-ended hunger strike had climbed to 11 from four.

Declining value of the federal minimum wage is a major factor driving inequality

Lawrence Mishel
Economic Policy Institute
Contrary to some political rhetoric of late, wage stagnation for American workers and rising inequality is not due to lack of effort; the broad middle class has increased its productivity, upgraded its educational attainment, and worked more hours. Rather it is due to certain policies that have weakened the bargaining position of low- and middle-wage workers. Among these policies is the refusal to set a the minimum wage at an enforceable 50 percent of the average wage.

Challenge to Voting Rights Act of 1965 - Analysis and Call to Action

Sidney Rosdeitcher, James J. Beha II
Brennan Center for Justice
On Wednesday, February 27, 2013, the Court will hear argument in one of the most significant cases of the current term, Shelby County v. Holder, a constitutional challenge to key provisions of Congress’s 2006 reauthorization of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The preclearance provisions being challenged are viewed as the heart of the Voting Rights Act and are credited with the enormous gains in the enfranchisement of black and other minority citizens.

Pages