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BDS Movement Turns 12 in July. Here Are 12 Wins From 2017 To Mark The Occasion

Palestinian BDS National Committee
Palestinian BDS National Committee
The Palestinian BDS National Committee (BNC) is the largest coalition in Palestinian civil society. It leads and supports the global Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement. Follow on social media. In face of continued USA-funded and supported Israeli atrocities, participate in BDS actions!

Trump Asked What Minority Americans Have to Lose by Voting for Him. We Now Have a Clear Answer.

German Lopez; Andrew Prokop
Vox
During the election Donald Trump made his pitch to black and Latino voters: “What do you have to lose?” Six months into his presidency, Trump is giving a very clear answer: quite a lot, actually. During the campaign Trump was clear about his commitments to rolling back racial justice and civil rights gains, fashioning his campaign on a “tough on crime” and “law and order” platform that many racial minorities recognized as a dog whistle for racist policies.

Dire Consequences if Trump Pulls out of Iran Deal; The Mask Is Off: Trump Is Seeking War with Iran

Mitchell Plitnick; Trita Parsi
Lobe Log Foreign Policy
Trump seems determined to go forward with a very hostile program toward Iran, and, although a baseless U.S. pullout from the nuclear deal seems unlikely, even the so-called ‘adults in the room’ are looking for a pretext. The White House is committed to finding a way to claim Iran has violated the nuclear deal, regardless of the facts — just as George W. Bush did with Iraq.

Banning Nuclear Weapons: The Beginning

H. Patricia Hynes
Portside
Against all odds, 122 countries agreed in July to ban nuclear weapons. At the heart of the United Nations treaty is an explicit ethical goal: to protect peoples of the world from the humanitarian catastrophe that would ensue if nuclear weapons were employed. Once 50 states ratify the treaty, it will enter into international law. The United States, the only country to use nuclear weapons, dropped the first atomic bomb on Aug. 6, 1945 at Hiroshima, and Aug. 9 on Nagasaki.

Harsher Sanctions on Venezuela Will Only Worsen the Nation's Crisis

Mark Weisbrot
The Hill
On Friday, a group of members of Congress published a letter opposing the threatened sanctions. It began, “We write to express our deep alarm regarding the escalating political, economic and social crisis in Venezuela and urge you to work with our regional partners to help prevent a civil war. We strongly recommend that you support negotiations mediated by respected external actors such as Pope Francis, who enjoys credibility with broad segments of Venezuela’s people.

Tidbits - August 3, 2017 - Reader Comments: Memories of the Southern Freedom Movement; Right to Water; Keeping Public Services Public; Fight for Health Care Access Continues; Sen. Gillibrand Takes Name Off Anti-Boycott Bill; Crisis in Venezuela; CEO Pay;

Portside
Reader Comments: Memories of the Southern Freedom Movement - Mary Hamilton; The Right to Water - Trump Action Endangers Millions; Keeping Public Services Public; Fight for Health Care Access Continues; Sen. Gillibrand Takes Name Off Anti-Boycott Bill; The Crisis in Venezuela - U.S. Involvement, and The Left; Hate Speech; Questions about Israel and the U.S.; CEO Pay; Palestinian Rights curriculum; An American in China; Dissident Arts Festival; Next Up for Single Payer

Organizers Say Quaint Baltimore Seafood Business Masks Shocking Labor Abuses

Bruce Vail
Working In These Times
Phillips Seafood is a Baltimore-based company famous for its crabs. Global and US unions want to make it infamous for its treatment of low-paid women workers. Phillips moved its Indonesian production from urban to rural mini-plants in order to inhibit access to labor law protections and unionization efforts. Closer to home, the company is a major opponent of attempts to raise the minimum wage.

Bolsheviks and Beyond: Revisiting John Reed's "Ten Days that Shook the World"

Michael Hirsch
Democratic Left
On the centennial of the Russian Revolution, John Reed's first-hand look at the uprising of workers, peasants, soldiers and sailors is fit reading about a mass movement that overthrew the old aristocracy and then the bourgeois class itself. An exposition on ordinary people making history for themselves, the book is a gripping account of events in Petrograd, when Lenin and the Bolsheviks lead the various workers councils in finally seizing state power.

The Backstory Behind the Unions that Bought a Chicago Sun-Times Stake

Brian Dolber
The Conversation
An investment group led by former Chicago alderman and businessman Edwin Eisendrath and the Chicago Federation of Labor recently pulled off an unusual feat when it acquired the Chicago Sun-Times. The purchase is a return to labor’s long tradition in fostering a broader public sphere.

Mourning in America

Peter E. Gordon
Boston Review
This new book, says Peter E. Gordon, argues that "ever since the fall of communism, a culture of defeat has characterized the left’s understanding of political history and theoretical critique." Gordon guides us through the intricacies of the case author Enzo Traverso makes in this volume.

James Baldwin: How To Cool It

Esquire Editors, James Baldwin
Esquire
In Esquire's July 1968 issue, published just after the death of Martin Luther King, Jr., the magazine talked to James Baldwin about the state of race relations in the country. On what would be the author's 93rd birthday, we've republished the interview in full—and his words are incredibly relevant today.

The Invisible Segregation of Diverse Neighborhoods

Jake Blumgart
Slate
Today, segregation in America looks different than it did a generation ago. Neighborhood-level diversity is increasingly common and, correspondingly, that all-white neighborhoods aren’t as prevalent. However, even in diverse neighborhoods, divisions of race and class still exert their power. Most social institutions, churches, recreations centers, restaurants, barber shops and hair shops, schools, and civic associations remain segregated.

Strong Unions Will Boost America's Economy

Rana Foroohar
Financial Times
The labour share of the overall economic pie is at a post-second world war low, which is an enormous problem in an economy that is 70 per cent dependent on consumer spending. The demise of the traditional union movement (which represents only 10.7 per cent of the American workforce today, half of what it was in the early 1980s), is one of the biggest contributors to that problem.

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