Archives

For posts before June 2012, please follow these links to our archives.

Leave blank for all. Otherwise, the first selected term will be the default instead of "Any".
E.g., 2016-02-13

Feeling the Yern: Why One Millenial Woman Would Rather Go to Hell Than Vote For Hillary

Holly Wood
The Village Voice
There seems to be no shortage of bizarrely sexist assumptions as to why I, a Millennial feminist, am not voting for Hillary Clinton. But speaking as a Millennial feminist, let me assure you: None of them is accurate. But the reason for my political disaffection is plain: There's no persuading me that the Democratic establishment — from where it sits now — has the capacity to represent me, or my values.

Interest in New Noam Chomsky Documentary Has Grown So Large That Even the NY Times Ran a Review—and Praised It!

Alexandra Rosenmann
AlterNet
The New York Times, which historically tends to ignore Chomsky, ran a prominent review in its Arts section, going so far as to praise the film and calling Requiem a "well-paced and cogent seminar." Reviewer Daniel Gold writes, "citing Aristotle, Adam Smith and James Madison, among others, he melds history, philosophy and ideology into a sobering vision of a society in an accelerating decline.

The Robin Hood of Leftovers

Anna Roth
Civil Eats
The New York-based nonprofit, Rescuing Leftover Cuisine, has recruited thousands of volunteers to help it work with organizations that have leftover food for institutions like homeless shelters and food pantries. The organization has “rescued” and donated 290,000 pounds of food since it started in late 2012.

Black Homebuyers Beware

Brandi Collins
Colorofchange
Warren Buffet owns the company that makes the most mobile home loans to Black borrowers in the country. And he’s stripping them of their hard-earned money.

Beyond Deportations: Fixing a Broken Immigration System

David Bacon
The Reality Check
When President Obama appointed Dollie Gee to the U.S. District Court in 2010, he undoubtedly didn't expect her to mount a frontal challenge to his administration's detention and deportation policies. But five years after her elevation as the first Chinese American woman on the federal bench, Gee ruled last summer that holding Central American women and children in private detention lockups was illegal.

What’s Next? Parecon or Participatory Economics

Michael Albert
The Next System Project
People now fighting economic injustice have no right to decide how future people should live. But we do have a responsibility to provide an institutional setting that facilitates future people deciding for themselves their own conditions of life and work. To this end, participatory economics, or parecon, describes the core institutions required to generate solidarity, equity, self-management, and an ecologically sound and classless economy.

Failed States and States of Failure: Headlines From the Future

Tom Engelhardt
TomDispatch
On an increasingly grim globe that seems to have failure stamped all over it, the surprises embedded in the years to come, the unexpected course changes, inventions, rebellions, and interventions offer, at least until they arrive, grounds for hope. On the other hand, in that same grim world, there's an aspect of the future that couldn’t be more depressing: the repetitiveness of so much that you might think no one would want to repeat.

Is Bernie Sanders Anti-Immigrant?

Matt Mazewski
Commonweal Magazine
There is a reason why Wall Street and all of corporate America likes immigration reform, and it is not, in my view, that they’re staying up nights worrying about undocumented workers in this country -- Bernie Sanders

The roots of the Chicago Freedom Movement

In September 1965 a dozen or so members of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s southern field staff moved into the West Side Christian Parish’s Project House in the heart of Chicago’s Near West Side, joining other volunteers already living there. Black and white, male and female, most of them still in their early twenties, they had already been tested by civil rights struggles in the South.

Black Culture and History Matter

Kirsten Mullen
The American Prospect
It took 150 years after America officially abolished slavery to get a national museum on the black experience.

What Little Babies See That You No Longer Can

Susana Martinez-Conde
Scientific American
Before developing perceptual constancy, three- to four-month-old babies have a striking ability to see image differences that are invisible to adults. They lose this superior skill around the age of five months

Pages