Donald J. Trump

The Power of Ordinary People Facing Totalitarianism

Kathleen B. Jones
The Conversation
Since Donald J. Trump’s election, sales of George Orwell’s “1984” have skyrocketed. But so have those of “The Origins of Totalitarianism,” by a German Jewish political theorist Hannah Arendt. Arendt’s insights into the development of totalitarianism are especially relevant to discussions of the increasing threats to U.S. democracy. Arendt’s Origins, which warns against submitting quietly to the order of the day, is an implicit call for resistance by ordinary people.

The Republican Health-Care Plan the Country Isn’t Debating

Drew Altman
Washington Post
Medicaid spending exceeds half a trillion dollars, and the program represents more than half of all federal funds spent by states. Medicaid has changed dramatically from its beginnings as a program largely for women and children on welfare. It now has more than 70 million beneficiaries, and its reach is so broad that almost two-thirds of Americans say that they, a family member or a friend have been covered by Medicaid at some point.

Marx on Immigration

David L. Wilson
Monthly Review
Marx wrote these passages nearly 150 years ago, and he was certainly not infallible: in the same letter he suggested optimistically that independence for Ireland might hasten "the social revolution in England." But a great deal of his analysis sounds remarkably contemporary.

"A Kick In The Ass" For Labor: A Union Leader Considers The Age Of Trump

Hamilton Nolan
The Concourse
"If the American labor movement thinks that we can just go out there and start and control the organizing that takes place, we’re not going to be successful," says Stuart Appelbaum, president of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. "I think what we can do is create an environment in which organizing takes place... We have to think of ourselves less as an institution, and more as a movement."

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