Globalization

Reactionary Working Class?

Asbjørn Wahl
Spectrezine
That millions of workers worldwide become "losers" in the process of globalization, should not surprise anyone. Nor that many react with mistrust and blind rebellion. That part of the working class – lacking left political parties with strategies to address this crisis -- are attracted by the extreme right’s verbal anti-establishment rhetoric, is against this background understandable. To understand, however, is not the same as to accept, let alone support.

Walter Rodney and the Racial Underpinnings of Global Inequality

Tianna Paschel
Items: SSRC
While inequality has become a topic of increased popularity and politicization in recent years, most of the attention has focused on how 1% own an increasingly large share of the world’s wealth, rather than on inequalities between nations. In a global context in which national borders and citizenship pose few barriers to the mobility of capital, the reality is also a story of the world’s richest nations continuing to reap a disproportionate amount of the globe’s profits.

Democracy, Trade, Globalization and Trump

Thomas Piketty; Naomi Klein
The Guardian (UK)
Rising inequality is largely to blame for this electoral upset. Continuing with business as usual is not an option. People have lost their sense of security, status and even identity. This result is the scream of an America desperate for radical change. People have a right to be angry, and a powerful, intersectional left agenda can direct that anger where it belongs. Thomas Piketty and Naomi Klein offer up interesting analysis.

New U.N. Report Shows Just How Awful Globalization and Informal Employment Are for Workers

Elizabeth Grossman
Working In These Times
An estimated 60.7 percent of the world’s workers labor in the informal economy, without legal or social protections. While the impact of working without the freedom to organize is most dire in the world’s poorest countries, U.S. workers are not an exception to the types of labor rights abuses the described in a United Nations Report.

The Abdication of the Left

Dani Rodrick
Project Syndicate
The experience in Latin America and southern Europe reveals perhaps a weakness of the left: the absence of a clear program to refashion capitalism and globalization for the twenty-first century. From Greece’s Syriza to Brazil’s Workers’ Party, the left has failed to come up with ideas that are economically sound and politically popular, beyond ameliorative policies such as income transfers.

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