NSA

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NSA Planned to Hijack Google App Store to Hack Smartphones

Ryan Gallagher
The Intercept
The NSA wanted to do use Google's app store as a launching pad to infect phones with spyware. They were also keen to hijack them as a way of sending “selective misinformation to the targets’ handsets” to spread propaganda or confuse adversaries. Moreover, the agency wanted to gain access to companies’ app store servers so they could secretly use them for “harvesting” information about phone users.

Why NSA Surveillance is Worse than You've Ever Imagined

James Bamford
Reuters
Despite the volume of revelations, much of the public remains largely unaware of the true extent of the NSA's vast, highly aggressive and legally questionable surveillance activities. Given the vast amount of revelations about NSA abuses, it is somewhat surprising that just slightly more than a majority of Americans seem concerned about government surveillance. Which leads to the question of why?

As Encryption Spreads, U.S. Grapples With Clash Between Privacy, Security

Ellen Nakashima and Barton Gellman
Washington Post
“I don’t believe that law enforcement has an absolute right to gain access to every way in which two people may choose to communicate,” said Marc Zwillinger, “And I don’t think our Founding Fathers would think so, either. The fact that the Constitution offers a process for obtaining a search warrant where there is probable cause is not support for the notion that it should be illegal to make an unbreakable lock. These are two distinct concepts.”

FBI's "Suicide Letter" to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Dangers of Unchecked Surveillance

Nadia Kayyali
The Electronic Frontier Foundation
Should intelligence agencies be able to sweep email, read texts, track calls, locate us by GPS? Much of the conversation swirls around the possibility that agencies like the N.S.A. or the F.B.I. will use such information not to serve national security but to carry out personal and political vendettas. King’s experience reminds us that these are far from idle fears, conjured in the fevered minds of civil libertarians. They are based in the hard facts of history.

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