Nuclear war

Why Should Trump―or Anyone―Be Able to Launch a Nuclear War?

Lawrence Wittner
History News Network
Ultimately the only long-term solution to the problem of national leaders launching a nuclear war is to get rid of the weapons. This was the justification for the nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT) of 1968, which constituted a bargain between two groups of nations. Under its provisions, non-nuclear countries agreed not to develop nuclear weapons, while nuclear-armed countries agreed to dispose of theirs.

Mikhail Gorbachev: 'It All Looks as if the World Is Preparing for War'

Mikhail Gorbachev
Time Magazine
The world today is overwhelmed with problems. Policymakers seem to be confused and at a loss. But no problem is more urgent today than the militarization of politics and the new arms race. Stopping and reversing this ruinous race must be our top priority. While state budgets are struggling to fund people's essential social needs, military spending is growing.

Tidbits - December 15, 2016 - Reader Comments: Global Nuclear War Danger; Clinton and Working Class Voters; Star Wars; The Left - What Now; Russian-Election Frenzy; Butter; #NoDAPL Actions; Cuba Travel; Holiday Book Offers; and more ...

Portside
Reader Comments: Global Nuclear War Danger - Avoiding the Unthinkable; Hillary Clinton and Working Class Voters; Art as Politics: Star Wars New Movie; What Now for the Left; Viewers debate the Russian-Election Frenzy; Brazil; W.E.B. DuBois and the Working Class; Student Digital Literacy and Technology; Butter - Good for You?; #NoDAPL December Month of Actions; Responsible and Ethical Cuba Travel; Special - Holiday Book Offers; and more ...

A Global Nuclear Winter: Avoiding the Unthinkable in India and Pakistan

Conn Hallinan
Foreign Policy in Focus
The single most dangerous spot on the globe, the current situation in Kashmir cannot continue. The Kashmiris should have their referendum — and both India and Pakistan will have to accept the results. The world cannot afford the current tensions to spiral down into a military confrontation that could easily get out of hand. Neither country would survive a nuclear war, and neither country should be spending its money on an arms race.

The Big Boom: Nukes and NATO - We May Be at a Greater Risk of Nuclear Catastrophe Than During the Cold War

Conn Hallinan
Dispatches from the Edge
Astounding increases in the danger of nuclear weapons have paralleled provocative foreign policy decisions that needlessly incite tensions between Washington and Moscow. It's been 71 years since atomic bombs destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and humanity's memory of those events has dimmed. The bombs that obliterated those cities were tiny by today's standards.

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