Obesity

More Soda Tax Success: Study Finds Mexico’s Tax Reduced Sugary Beverage Buys Two Years in A Row

Kim Krisberg
Science Blogs / The Pump Handle
This study isn’t the only one to show the positive impacts of sugary beverage taxes. This study on Berkeley’s soda tax found a whopping 21 percent decrease in sugary beverage consumption. At Harvard, researchers predicted that Philadelphia’s sugary beverage tax, which went into effect this year, could prevent 36,000 cases of obesity over 10 years, prevent more than 2,000 cases of diabetes in the first year after the tax reaches its full effect, and save $200 million.

A Behavioral Scientist Talks Food Psychology and the Myth of Willpower

MADINA PAPADOPOULOS
Cooks Science
Interview with behavioral scientist Dr. Brian Wansink, author of Mindless Eating (2006) and Slim by Design (2014) and founder of the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University. The Food and Brand Lab was started in 1997 at the University of Illinois (before moving to Cornell in 2005), to explore how humans relate to food with the end goal of uncovering solutions to improve eating environments and help individuals eat better. Wansink analyzes why we eat what we eat.

Food Industry Funding of Nutrition Research: The Relevance of History for Current Debates

Marion Nestle, PhD, MPH1
JAMA Internal Medicine
A deep dive into archival documents from the 1950s and 1960s produced compelling evidence that a sugar trade association not only paid for but also initiated and influenced research expressly to exonerate sugar as a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD).

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