Portside Culture

Posted by Portside on August 13, 2017
Vulture
How can films and television create honest dystopian worlds if they ignore the racial strictures that make these narratives possible in the first place?
Posted by Portside on August 11, 2017
Pank Magazine
This is a poem about abortion--the law versus the rights of women--by the poet Danielle DeTiberus. Here's why she wrote it: Currently, 25 states regulate that a woman undergo an ultrasound before having an abortion. In some cases, the doctor performing the ultrasound must narrate the procedure, following a script which the AMA has found to contain false and misleading information.
Posted by Portside on August 10, 2017
New Politics
For three decades, eight members of the Quimpo family dedicated themselves to the anti-Marcos resistance in the Philippines, sometimes at profound personal cost. In this memoir, they tell stories that comprise a family saga of revolution, persistence, and, ultimately, vindication, even as easy resolution eluded them. The authors are also critical of the Communist Party of the Philippines and its rural-based strategy of protracted people’s war.
Posted by Portside on August 9, 2017
The New Inquiry
That the Nazis based their racist laws in large part on U.S. white supremacist law is a widely known fact. This new study is a contemporary and detailed look at the correspondences between the two legal regimes.
Posted by Portside on August 8, 2017
New York Review of Books
Food, housing, health—is what the revolution fought for. A drowsy old sugar island whose slaves’ descendants were now mostly farmers and fisher-folk became vibrant with people crowding revolutionary rallies to dance and chant slogans that sounded like reggae songs and were affixed to brightly colored signs around the island: “Forward Ever, Backward Never”; “It takes a revolution, to make a solution”; “Not a second, without the people.”
Posted by Portside on August 7, 2017
New Food Magazine
According to the findings of the International Food Information Council Foundation’s 12th Annual Food and Health Survey, Americans are consuming food information from more sources than ever before, yet our nutritional literacy is sorely lacking – and our health may be suffering as a result.
Posted by Portside on August 6, 2017
MarketWatch
Netflix's Ozark brings capitalism's corrosive effects to middle america through the lens of a financial adviser and money laundering. Right from the opening monologue narrated by star Jason Bateman, Netflix’s new drama “Ozark” makes clear it doesn’t just want to depict a financial adviser up to his neck in danger. It’s out to convey profound truths about money.

Pages