Revolutionary Thought

Looking Back on October, 1917

Carl Davidson
Changemaker Publications
November 7, 1917, the American writer John Reed said, was "Ten Days That Shook the World." A hundred years on, the anniversary of the October Revolution is celebrated and debated. But, for more than seventy years the revolution inspired millions around the world, in the belief in socialism, and for an end to colonialism.

Why Millennials Aren't Afraid of Socialism

Julia Mead
The Nation
It's an old idea, but the people who will make it happen are young - and tired of the unequal world they've inherited. I will come of age in the era of Trump. It's a bleak generational landmark, but ideological capitulation and despair are not the answer. In the 1930s and 1940s, many of the most dedicated antifascists were communists. The antidote to radical exploitation and exclusion is radical egalitarianism and inclusion.

Antonio Gramsci Jr: On Remembering His Grandfather

Antonio Gramsci, Jr.
New Left Review
Through the use of family archives and other new sources, the grandson of Italian revolutionary Antonio Gramsci seeks to reconstruct the cultural and political saliance of his grandfather's contributions to building and defending the Italian working class movement and international socialism in the face of Stalinist distortions, capitalist enmity and today's reactionary Russian regime.

Being a Revolutionary in Cuba Today

Enrique Ubieta G¢mez
Granma (Cuba)
Socialist democracy, essentially superior, still has a long way to go. Being revolutionary is participating with a perspective of committed criticism. Criticizing is not reporting a known fact; it is acting on it, pushing toward its solution... Radicalism in understanding and in action; the revolutionary seeks the root of a problem, even when it cannot be extirpated immediately, even when one errs in pointing it out and moves rapidly into action....

The (R)evolutionary Vision and Contagious Optimism of Grace Lee Boggs

Barbara Ransby
In These Times
Grace Lee Boggs died yesterday at the age of 100. Boggs' love for humanity ran strong and deep, serving as a generative force for creating change. She was not a part of an elite intelligentsia. She lived in a modest little house on an even more modest income. She never held a tenured university job. She believed that ordinary people, not academics, had the power to understand their lives and to change the world with that understanding.

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