Social Movements

Mapping American Social Movements Through the 20th Century

Mapping American Social Movements
University of Washington
Mapping Social Movements Through the 20th Century, a project directed by Professor James N. Gregory, allows us to see where social movements were active and where not, helping us better understand patterns of influence and endurance. It exposes new dimensions of American political geography, showing how locales that in one era fostered certain kinds of social movements often changed political colors over time.

Tidbits - Sept 7, 2017 - Reader Comments: Long Arc of Protest; DACA; KKK Terror; Differing views: How Should We Protest Neo-Nazis; Health Plan that We Need; Spam Filtering; Healthcare Growing - Workers Not Sharing; Children's Book to get; Announcements; a

Portside
Reader Comments: The Long Arc of Protest; DACA; Korea; KKK Terror; Differing views: How Should We Protest Neo-Nazis; Fukushima Leak; The Health Plan that We Need, With No Copays; Spam Filtering is a free speech issue; Resources: Healthcare Sector is Growing, But Workers Aren't Sharing; Children's Book Celebrating Labor Movement; Anti-BDS legislation impacts You; Announcements: Conversation: "The Color of Law"; 60 Years of Peace Action; and Union Day o

It’s Not Only Necessary to Develop an Alternative to Globalization — It’s Entirely Possible

Walden Bellow
Foreign Policy in Focus
It was the left who diagnosed the ills of globalization. So why is the right eating our lunch? Today global capitalism is in a period of long-term stagnation following the global financial crisis. The newer protests represent a far broader disenchantment with capitalism than the protests of the 2000s. The building blocks of an alternative economic model are there - sustainable development, de-growth, and de-globalization.

Protest Legacy in US History and 10 Proposal for Social Movements

David A. Horowitz
Portside
Social justice protest offers an indispensable and even inspiring view of US history. At the same time, movements for social change must be placed within their historical and social context. In truth, activists often have to rely on middle-class alliances in and out of the political establishment while forging compromises, even unsavory ones, before achieving success.

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