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Marxism as ‘Organized Sarcasm’

Richard Seymour Salvage
Saying Marxism is a science is preface. Add organized sarcasm and we come closer to mocking not so much intimate feelings associated with worldly illusions but their form in a particular perishable world. It aims to give new form to certain aspirations, the better to regenerate them. Yet if Marxist movements are to be effective, they must create new tastes and a new language for struggles to be born. Sarcasm then is about what outrages our sense of what should be.

books

Audre Lorde’s ‘Your Silence Will Not Protect You’

Bridget Minamore The White Review
Audre Lorde (1934-1992) was one of the most significant U.S. writers of the last quarter of the 20th Century. She described herself as "Black, lesbian, mother, warrior, poet." This new collection of her poetry and prose allows readers to remind themselves of her thought and its significance.

food

Seven Foundational Cookbooks That Shaped American Cooking

Ali Slagle Saveur.com
America: The Cookbook author Gabrielle Langholtz shares the texts that helped craft the United States’ regional culinary traditions For her book, America: The Cookbook, Gabrielle Langholtz looked at cookbooks as well as narrative and anthropological books to fully explore America’s culinary history—Little House on the Prairie and the Sterns’ many varied books among them.

tv

‘Babylon Berlin’ Is A Big-Budget Cautionary Tale Against Bigotry and Excess

Tess Cagle Daily Dot
Aside from the sheer entertainment of the series, Babylon Berlin offers its new American audience the warning it needs in 2018. As the plot progresses, Rath must choose between his morals and nationalism—something Americans struggle with often in the 21st century. But Babylon Berlin shows us how a progressive nation can crumble when it allows bigotry and intolerance to fester.

books

Philip K. Dick and the Fake Humans

Henry Farrell Boston Review
We’re not living in the dystopias of George Orwell or Aldous Huxley, the author insists, but in the shifty algorithmic universe of Philip K. Dick, where the world that the Internet and social media shape is less a system than an ecology, a proliferation of unexpected niches, and entities created and adapted to exploit them in deceptive ways. In this view, it’s a world in which technology is developing in ways that fudge the difference between the human and the artificial.

books

The Captive Aliens Who Remain Our Shame

Annette Gordon-Reed The New York Review of Books
This "very important" book offers a new examination of the role of African Americans in the American Revolution and of how racism was used in the service of creating the United States in the late 18th Century.

Labor

labor

Statewide Walkout Announced for W.V. School Teachers and Employees

Caity Coyne Charleston Gazette-Mail
Teachers and public employees have been demonstrating for weeks, including a massive all-day protest at the Capitol on Friday, asking lawmakers to fully fund the Public Employees Insurance Agency and increase pay.

labor

In Uganda, Unions Are Helping to Drive Transport Workers Into Decent Work

Diana Taremwa Karakire Equal Times
The Uganda transport workers strategy for organising informal economy workers was based on understanding that these workers are often already organised, not within unions, but through credit and savings cooperatives, self-help groups, community-based organisations and associations.

labor

The Ugly Memphis Sanitation Workers’ Strike

DeNeen L. Brown The Washington Post
Jerry Wurf, the national president of the public workers union American Federation of State County and Municipal Employees, considered the Memphis sanitation workers’ protest more than a strike; it became a social struggle, a battle for dignity. Wurf called the strike a “race conflict and a rights conflict.”

labor

Vermont Teachers Say They Feel ‘Attacked’ by Policymakers

Tiffany Danitz Pache VTDigger
"Women's Work? Voices of Vermont Educators" details the reality of work for teachers and paraeducators in Vermont. These workers are putting in long hours to meet growing student needs, as the opioid epidemic is on the rise, and child poverty grows. They are spending their own money to buy food and clothes for students. They are supporting their families as the primary breadwinner, and paying off high levels of loan debt. And they feel disrespected because they work in a female-dominated profession.

labor

Janus is Coming. Are You Ready?

Bonnie Castillo Medium
On February 26, with a pro-corporate majority Supreme Court, a single case threatens to unravel the protections public sector nurses have fought so hard to secure for their patients over the years. “Janus v. AFSCME” is intended to weaken public sector unions by encouraging employees in unionized public sector workplaces to refuse to pay dues — while they enjoy the rights and benefits of a union contract and representation.

Friday nite video

video

How Some Democrats Aided The NRA-GOP Agenda

Controversial historical footage implicates key Democrats in the gun lobby efforts to stop any gun control in congress. Ari Melber’s special report.

video

How Tech Giants Feed Off Capitalism's Failures

Uber, Lyft, Airbnb and other successful tech giants are disrupting our everyday lives ... but is all that disruption a good thing? Are they fixing holes in our economy, or just digging a bigger one that's six feet deep?

video

Russia Hacks Voter Rolls & Rob Porter Resigns

 
A top-secret report finds that Russia hacked U.S. voter rolls in the 2016 election, and White House staffer Rob Porter steps down amid domestic abuse allegations.

video

"Unforgettable"

The energy and artistry of young Ugandans' dance moves, brought to us by French Montana.