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For posts before June 2012, please follow these links to our archives.

Brotopia

Shannon Liao The Verge
This book has received a lot of attention since its publication, as a pioneering study of not just the fact of gender discrimination in the tech industry, but also as a glimpse into how such discrimination works.

Americans Eat and Inhale Over 70,000 Plastic Particles Each Year

Mandy Oaklander Time.com
Air, bottled water and seafood were the biggest sources for ingested microplastics. If you live somewhere with clean, safe tap water, relying less on bottled water is a great place to start reducing your plastics exposure.

The American Paranoia of Stranger Things 3

Sophie Gilbert The Atlantic
Stranger Things 3 is more deeply informed by American paranoia than ever before, as the show starts to mine classic, Cold War–inspired works of the mid-1980s.

Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory

Alexandra Teague Poetry Northwest
Idaho poet Alexandra Teague takes us back to a child’s innocent, albeit cloudy, view of the world (in contrast to its perverse current state.)

Workers Oppression is a Theme of Stunning Radical Play “Hadestown”

Lucy Komisar The Komisar Scoop
“Hadestown,” written and composed by Anaïs Mitchell and directed by Rachel Chavkin, is a very radical play. It takes the audience to Hell, which is peopled by oppressed workers who have been indoctrinated to fear those who are poorer.

'On Earth' Is Gorgeous All The Way Through

Heller McAlpin NPR
This new novel by Vietnamese-American poet and writer Ocean Vuong, is an immigrant's story that, writes reviewer McAlpin, is also about "beauty, survival, and freedom, which sometimes isn't freedom at all."

How Seed Saving Is Repairing a Painful Past for Native Americans

Liz Susman Karp Modern Farmer
“Rematriation allows Native Americans to produce foods and seeds and gain a true sense of sovereignty,” says chef Sean Sherman
Seed saving is an ancient practice of saving seeds and reproductive matter from plants for future use. For Native Americans, it is spiritually meaningful because they believe that seeds are living, breathing beings from whom they are descended.