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For posts before June 2012, please follow these links to our archives.

How Sudan’s Protesters Upped the Ante, And Forced Al-Bashir from Power

Andrew Edward Tchie The Conversation
Following months of protests, and a prolonged sit-in outside the military headquarters in Khartoum, Sudanese president Omar al-Bashir was placed under house arrest on April 11 as the country’s military prepared for a transitional government.

A Grim Take on the State of the News Business

Maria Puente USA Today
A look at the state of investigative reporting and long form journalism, a former New York Times editor details threats to an informed public coming from the decline of newspapers and the rise of social media gimmicks that beggar fact-based writing.

Are Urban Planners Partly to Blame for Gentrification?

Tanner Howard CityLab
The world’s real estate is worth an estimated $217 trillion, making up more than 60 percent of global assets. Even though three-quarters of that amount is tied up in housing, it hasn’t translated to secure shelter or prosperity for many...

Global Left Midweek - April 10, 2019

Portside
Cuba survives, Yellow Vests meet, South Africa's new left party, Germans demands nationalized housing, New ferment in Mideast, Anti-Modi unity, New unions in UK, Slovenia's left

Why Hannah Arendt is the Philosopher for Now

Lyndsey Stonebridge New Statesman America
The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951), by Hannah Arendt, has much to teach us in our troubled times. In this essay, Lyndsey Stonebridge offers a fine overview of Arendt's life and times, and puts her classic study in its proper context.