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For posts before June 2012, please follow these links to our archives.

The Ugly Memphis Sanitation Workers’ Strike

DeNeen L. Brown The Washington Post
Jerry Wurf, the national president of the public workers union American Federation of State County and Municipal Employees, considered the Memphis sanitation workers’ protest more than a strike; it became a social struggle, a battle for dignity. Wurf called the strike a “race conflict and a rights conflict.”

Opioid Makers Funneled Millions to Patient Advocacy Groups

Julia Lurie Mother Jones
The groups that received pharmaceutical funding—like the US Pain Foundation and the Academy of Integrative Pain Management—in turn issued guidelines minimizing the risks of opioid addiction, lobbied to change laws aimed at curbing opioid abuse, and sought to protect doctors sued for overprescribing painkillers, according to a Senate report released Monday by Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill (D).

Slavery and the American University

Alex Carp New York Review of Books
From their very beginnings, the American university and American slavery have been intertwined, but only recently are we beginning to understand how deeply.

Newly Released Documents Show Dakota Access Pipeline Is Discriminatory Against Indigenous People

Ardalan Raghian Truthout
Native American mother and child protesting
Records obtained through a recent Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request reveal that the United States Army Corps of Engineers inappropriately attempted to guide the companies funding DAPL toward providing an environmental justice analysis of the pipeline that would conclude that there was no disproportionate impact on a racial minority. Internal Corps email excerpts -- received through discovery by Earthjustice -- show the decision makers behind the pipeline wearing lenses fogged with racism.