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The Republican Health-Care Plan the Country Isn’t Debating

Drew Altman
Washington Post
Medicaid spending exceeds half a trillion dollars, and the program represents more than half of all federal funds spent by states. Medicaid has changed dramatically from its beginnings as a program largely for women and children on welfare. It now has more than 70 million beneficiaries, and its reach is so broad that almost two-thirds of Americans say that they, a family member or a friend have been covered by Medicaid at some point.

Marx on Immigration

David L. Wilson
Monthly Review
Marx wrote these passages nearly 150 years ago, and he was certainly not infallible: in the same letter he suggested optimistically that independence for Ireland might hasten "the social revolution in England." But a great deal of his analysis sounds remarkably contemporary.

FX’s Taboo Is More Fun to Think About Than to Watch

Matt Zoller Seitz
Vulture
Taboo is about the return of the repressed, but also the suppressed, with the protagonist serving as a vessel for social commentary about the species-wide violence and corruption wrought by imperialism, racism, and capitalism.

Bank Workers Will Protest to Form Their First US Union — And The Whole World Is Watching

Jack Smith IV
.mic
On Tuesday, over 15,000 U.S. bank workers with the Spain-based bank Santander will declare their intent to establish this country's first bank workers' union. They'll deliver petitions, take over corporate lobbies and begin the long struggle to bring collective bargaining to an industry with predatory practices and lots of low-wage workers.

Beyond Cynicism Why the GOP Made Peace with Trump

William E. Scheuerman
Boston Review
For followers of Hayek eager to smash the “para-government,” Trump must look like a godsend. How might conservatives do so? By advancing drastic institutional changes even Hayek conceded could seem undemocratic, such as making voting a once-in-a-lifetime act, for example, and lengthening legislative terms to fifteen years. Resting on popular support, the welfare state’s curtailment required attacking democracy.

Lawsuit Ends Georgia's Onerous Voter Registration Rules

Sue Sturgis
Facing South
Georgia will have to do away with its exact-match voter registration verification scheme thanks to a lawsuit filed last year by voting rights advocacy groups. The program resulted in the disenfranchisement of some 42,000 people, disproportionately people of color -- but now it's being considered by other states including Florida, Virginia and West Virginia.

Listen Liberals: Russia Is Not Our Enemy

Dan Kovalik, Labor & Human Rights Lawyer
Huffington Post
While I certainly understand it is in the interest of the military-industrial complex, to continue to vilify Russia in order to justify our already-bloated military spending, I am a bit taken aback at how eager most liberals are to embrace and even stoke this demonization.

Israeli Interference in US Politics: A Conspiracy in Plain Sight

Philip Weiss
Mondoweiss
U.S. policymakers and the major media are embroiled in a heated debate over the purported Russian meddling in U.S. politics, but Israeli interference in U.S. politics is the conspiracy in plain sight that no one talks about. Israel intervenes in U.S. domestic and foreign policy all the time, but it never is a scandal. The reason is simple. The U.S. Congress, Republicans and Democrats alike, and the major media, including the so-called liberal media, are all complicit.

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