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Hezbollah Takes Journalists in Lebanon on a Tour to Prove Trump Wrong

Liz Sly and Suzan Haidamous
Washington Post
“The current American president is ignorant of the region,” said Hezbollah spokesman Mohammed Afif, speaking to reporters in a cave until recently occupied by Nusra. “We are the force that fights terrorism while the United States continues to support terrorism in many forms.”

We Asked Financial Advisers: How Realistic is Netflix’s New Show, ‘Ozark’?

Tom Teodorczuk
MarketWatch
Netflix's Ozark brings capitalism's corrosive effects to middle america through the lens of a financial adviser and money laundering. Right from the opening monologue narrated by star Jason Bateman, Netflix’s new drama “Ozark” makes clear it doesn’t just want to depict a financial adviser up to his neck in danger. It’s out to convey profound truths about money.

A Manual for a New Era of Direct Action

George Lakey
Waging NonViolence
What follows is a different manual from the one we put out over 50 years ago. Then, movements operated in a robust empire that was used to winning its wars. The government was fairly stable and held great legitimacy in the eyes of the majority.

A Vatican Shot Across the Bow for Hard-Line U.S. Catholics

Jason Horowitz
N.Y.Times
The article warns that conservative American Catholics have strayed dangerously into the deepening political polarization in the United States. The writers even declare that the worldview of American evangelical and hard-line Catholics, which is based on a literal interpretation of the Bible, is “not too far apart’’ from jihadists.

GE’s Switch

Stephen Maher
Jacobin
Jeff Immelt’s resignation as CEO of General Electric shows that we cannot think of industry as finance’s opponent.

US Military Burns Its Waste, a Tiny Black Community Pays the Toxic Price

Abrahm Lustgarten
ProPublica
When a stockpile of aging explosives blew up at a former Army ammunition plant in Minden, Louisiana, the U.S. military had a public relations disaster on their hands. What were they going to do with the remaining 18 million pounds of old explosives? They shipped it to a plant in Colfax, a tiny, African-American corner of Louisiana, the only commercial facility in the nation allowed to burn explosives and munitions waste with no environmental emissions controls.

Where? Where Are You Going?

Esther Kamkar
Portside.org
"Even if the sea does not swallow you," writes the poet Esther Kamkar (herself a migrant to North America) about the experience of migration, "your heart will be broken."

The Pentagon Playbook for Recruiting Students

Pat Elder
Buzzflash/Truthout
Ominous developments in three states this summer -- Oregon, Texas, New Jersey, and one city -- Chicago, provide a glimpse into the Pentagon's new playbook to recruit soldiers from high schools across the country. In brief, the military has been engaged in a robust lobbying campaign to lower academic standards to make it easier to recruit youth.

The Latest Challenges to the South's Felony Disenfranchisement Laws

Olivia Paschal
Facing South
While all Southern states have laws disenfranchising people while they are incarcerated and on probation or parole, Florida stands out with one of the nation's most restrictive felony disenfranchisement laws — one of only four states that impose a lifetime ban on voting for anyone convicted of a felony. The others are Virginia, Kentucky and Iowa.

Courts Must Hold Executive Branch Accountable for Drone Strikes

Marjorie Cohn
Truthout
"It is not the role of the Judiciary to second-guess the determination of the Executive, in coordination with the Legislature, that the interests of the US call for a particular military action in the ongoing War on Terror." Taking issue with the DC Circuit's application of the political question doctrine, it was queried, "if judges will not check this outsized power, then who will?" Our democracy is broken."

Clinton Lost Because PA, WI, and MI Have High Casualty Rates and Saw Her as Pro-war, Study Says

Philip Weiss
Mondoweiss
An important new study has come out showing that Clinton paid for this arrogance: professors argue that Clinton lost the battleground states of Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Michigan in last year’s presidential election because they had some of the highest casualty rates during the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and voters there saw Clinton as the pro-war candidate.

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