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G.O.P. Senators Might Not Realize It, but Not One State Supports the A.H.C.A.

Christopher Warshaw and David Broockman
New York Times
It’s no secret that the American Health Care Act is unpopular. In recent national polls, only about 29 percent of Americans support the bill. It is the most unpopular piece of major legislation Congress has considered in decades — even more unloved than TARP (“the bailout”), and much more unpopular than the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

The Public’s “Julius Caesar” Brilliantly Trolls Donald Trump, and Masses “Resist”

Lucy Komisar
The Komisar Scoop
Oskar Eustis, director of a mesmerizing Public Theater staging of Shakespeare’s play about taking down an incipient dictator, says that “Julius Caesar can be read as a warning parable to those who try to fight for democracy by undemocratic means. To fight the tyrant does not mean imitating him.” This Delacorte Central Park enactment may be one of the best of the plays inspired (or provoked) by the election and presidency of Donald Trump.

Tidbits - June 15, 2017 - Reader Comments: Impeachment, Not McCarthyism - Differing Views; Who Were Trump Voters; Bernie Sanders, and Working Families Party; United and Popular Front Lessons; Why Corbyn Won; Healthcare for All God's Children; and more...

Portside
Reader Comments: Impeachment, Not McCarthyism - Differing Reader Views; Who Were Trump Voters; Bernie Sanders, Our Revolution and the Working Families Party; United Front, Popular Front Lessons; Why Corbyn Won; Healthcare for All God's Children; California Single-Payer; A Message to Our Community on 50 Years of Occupation; Resources: When Black Women Succeed, All Women Succeed; Iran 1953: State Department Finally Releases Updated Official History of Mosaddeq Coup; m

Bill Clinton: His Career a Disaster for Black Americans

Nathan J. Robinson
Jacobin
With all the toxicity coming out of the White House and the GOP-dominated Congress, it's important to remember how insufferable were the politics of the neoliberal Democrats in power under Bill Clinton. The book under review (an article derived from the book is below) should help us remember how malignant were the Clinton years when it came to economic and social justice.

Egyptian Regime Responds to Economic Crisis by Repressing Workers

Pino Dragoni
il manifesto
In the past 11 months, 151 workers and trade unionists have been arrested in Egypt and at least 2,691 have been fired taking legal strike actions. Repression of conflicts in the workplace has increased dramatically within the last few months, together with the worsening economic crisis. Recent economic and monetary policies have caused a dramatic deterioration in the living conditions of workers and the middle classes.

Life on Mars

Magdalena Ball
Blogcritics
This week the Librarian of Congress, Carla Hayden, named Tracy K. Smith as the U.S. Poet Laureate for 2017-2018. Smith is the fifth African American poet and the fourth black woman to hold the honor. She is the author of three books of poems, the most recent of which, Life on Mars, won a Pulitzer Prize in 2012. A link to the Library of Congress citation, and a review, from 2012, of Life on Mars, are posed below.

The Status of Black Women in the United States

Institute for Women's Policy Research
National Domestic Workers Alliance
Black women consistently work for a better country, but our country is not working for them. By placing Black women’s experiences and interests in the forefront of policy changes and social movements, we can address these barriers. A new report on the Status of Black Women written and co-produced by Institute for Women's Policy Research and National Domestic Workers Alliance that paints a picture of the lived experiences of millions of Black women across the US.

Mayor-elect Lumumba: Jackson 'to be the most radical city on the planet'

Anna Wolfe
The Clarion-Ledger
"The Wednesday after the election I woke up in Jackson, Mississippi, and what that means is, no matter whether our country has experienced great boons or busts, in Mississippi, we've always been at the bottom," Mayor-elect Chokwe Antar Lumumba said. "We have to decide that we're going to rescue ourselves. That in places like Jackson, we won't allow it to be havens of oppression which endangers all of us."

Reading Gramsci in Latin America

Nicolas Allen and Hernán Ouviña
NACLA Reports
Presiding over last month’s honorary Gramsci conference in Buenos Aires was a sense of urgency: a need redress certain aspects of Gramsci’s thinking in light of a reactionary uptick throughout the continent. The ability of right-wing movements—in Venezuela, Brazil, and elsewhere—to mobilize mass demonstrations against progressive governments has led several commentators to orient themselves through a rereading of Gramsci’s writings on fascism.

Future of Unions in Balance as Trump Prepares to Reshape National Labor Board

Nicole Hallett
The Conversation
A new Republican-controlled National Labor Relations Board could roll back pro-union decisions dating back decades. This could be devastating to already weakened unions. With private sector union membership hovering at a dismal 6.4 percent – down from about 17 percent in 1983 – nothing short of the end of the labor movement could be at stake.

The Supreme Court Just Made Our Messed Up Immigration Law Even Worse

Ian Millhiser
Think Progress
The practical consequence of Monday’s decision in Morales-Santana is that fewer children of U.S. citizens will themselves gain citizenship, and that more people will be subject to deportation. It also means that the individual at the heart of this case, Luis Ramón Morales-Santana, is now set to be deported to a nation he has not lived in since 1975.

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