folk music

Anti-Fascism and Racial Struggle in Song

Meredith Holmgren
Smithsonian Folkways Recordings
The events that unfolded last month in Charlottesville, Virginia, when neo-fascist protests against the removal of a Confederate monument escalated to the deaths of three persons, have stirred nationwide debate about the history of fascism and white supremacy. The music from Smithsonian Folkways' large collection also forces us to consider how musicians have historically responded to fascism and white supremacy.

Tidbits - May 18, 2017 - Reader Comments: Comey Firing, Trump Base, Family Trump, Afghan Escalation, Sessions' Dept. of Injustice; Poor Prisons; Solidarity Statement for Yale Graduate Union; Resistance Summer; Chelsea is Free; and more...

Portside
Reader Comments: Comey, Trumpism, Family Trump, Afghan Escalation, Sessions' Dept.

Walter O’Brien: The Man Who Never Returned

Peter Dreier and Jim Vrabel
Jacobin
Most Americans know the song “MTA,” popularized by the Kingston Trio in 1959. It’s the one about a “man named Charlie” doomed to “ride forever ’neath the streets of Boston . . . the man who never returned.” What’s forgotten, however, is that the song was originally made for a left-wing political campaign. In 1949, the Boston People’s Artists wrote “MTA” for a left-wing candidate. The song became a hit — the man behind it disappeared.

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