immigrant rights

Trump’s First 100 DAYS: Immigrant Women and Families on the Frontlines

Amanda Baran and Sameera Hafiz
We Belong Together
While the executive orders, guidances, rhetoric and tweets of the past 100 days have stirred fear and anxiety in communities around the country and the world, immigrant women and women of color have continued to raise their voices, by organizing, mobilizing, engaging members of Congress and local elected leaders, in order to lead and defend our democracy.

How Crossing the Border From Mexico Became a Crime

Kelly Lytle Hernandez
The Conversation
Unauthorized entry into the U.S. wasn’t always a crime and Mexican immigrants didn’t always fear prosecution. Congress’ early efforts to include Mexicans in its “whites only immigration policy” were stymied by Western agribusiness, which wanted unfettered access to Mexican laborers. Up stepped a white supremacist South Carolina Senator with a compromise. Coleman Blease’s Immigration Act of 1929 dramatically altered the story of crime and punishment in the United States.

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