nuclear weapons

Diplomacy With North Korea Has Worked Before, and Can Work Again

Tim Shorrock
The Nation
The war hawks are wrong when they say that past negotiations, like the 1994 Agreed Framework, didn’t make a difference. August 2017 was a reminder of the scariest, and riskiest, days of the Cold War. All month long, Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un engaged in a bitter war of words that escalated into tit-for-tat displays of military might and ended with mutual threats of mass destruction.

Korea – Who is the Madman?; Guam Is Being Destroyed – by the U.S.

Mehdi Hasan; Juan Cole; Leilani Ganser
Most nonproliferation experts — as well as former President Jimmy Carter and a number of former Pentagon and State Department officials, both Republican and Democrat — agree that the brutal and murderous Kim, for all his bluster, is not irrational or suicidal, but bent on preserving his regime and preventing a U.S. attack. Nuclear weapons are a defensive, not an offensive, tool for the North Korean leadership.

Tidbits - August 10, 2017 - Reader Comments: Korea; Nagasaki; Nuclear Weapons; NAACP Warns Black Travelers When Visiting Missouri; Medicare March; Healthcare and Democrats; UAW-Nissan Election Defeat; Venezuela; Hard-Line Catholics; KXL; and more...

Portside
Reader Comments: Korea; Nagasaki; Nuclear Weapons; NAACP Warns Black Travelers When Visiting Missouri; Medicare March; Healthcare; How Democrats Can Win - How They Must Fight; UAW-Nissan Election Defeat; Venezuela; Vatican and Hard-Line Catholics; Last Chance to Comment Against KXL; Announcements: Zapatista Music Celebration; Feminist Organizing School; and more...

Dire Consequences if Trump Pulls out of Iran Deal; The Mask Is Off: Trump Is Seeking War with Iran

Mitchell Plitnick; Trita Parsi
Lobe Log Foreign Policy
Trump seems determined to go forward with a very hostile program toward Iran, and, although a baseless U.S. pullout from the nuclear deal seems unlikely, even the so-called ‘adults in the room’ are looking for a pretext. The White House is committed to finding a way to claim Iran has violated the nuclear deal, regardless of the facts — just as George W. Bush did with Iraq.

Banning Nuclear Weapons: The Beginning

H. Patricia Hynes
Portside
Against all odds, 122 countries agreed in July to ban nuclear weapons. At the heart of the United Nations treaty is an explicit ethical goal: to protect peoples of the world from the humanitarian catastrophe that would ensue if nuclear weapons were employed. Once 50 states ratify the treaty, it will enter into international law. The United States, the only country to use nuclear weapons, dropped the first atomic bomb on Aug. 6, 1945 at Hiroshima, and Aug. 9 on Nagasaki.

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