Portside Labor

Posted by Portside on January 23, 2017
On Labor: Workers, Unions and Politics
Some critics, including some in the labor movement, suggest that unions have to abandon collective bargaining and pursue other strategies for worker gains, such as winning higher wages through legislation. But collective bargaining can still work, and it is still necessary.
Posted by Portside on January 22, 2017
In These Times
As inequality and its consequences mount, even more struggles and progressive formations will emerge. They are likely to be imperfect and messy, but from them useful ideas as to the future of collective worker action will become clearer. One thing is sure, though: Such a vision will not come from Andy Stern.
Posted by Portside on January 21, 2017
Post and Courier
"Labor and community groups supporting the efforts by Boeing workers to form a union will also be in attendance," the IAM's announcement states. Evans, the IAM's lead organizer in North Charleston, and Ken Riley, the longtime president of the local longshoremen's union, are scheduled to speak at Friday's event.
Posted by Portside on January 19, 2017
Stansbury Forum
King’s strategic advice to the striking Memphis sanitation workers is still useful: winning requires placing the struggle in a larger context that challenges elected officials and government at every level to make America a better nation!
Posted by Portside on January 18, 2017
New York Daily News
Many New York unions are joining the Women's March on Washington including District Council 37, the United Federation of Teachers, the New York State Nurses Association, the National Writers Union, Writers Guild of America East, United Food and Commercial Workers 1500, New York State United Teachers and 32BJ SEIU.
Posted by Portside on January 17, 2017
The Atlantic
Mothers—and some fathers—are increasingly suing employers for discriminating against working parents. They are succeeding.
Posted by Portside on January 16, 2017
Blue MauMau
The confirmation hearing for Trump's Secretary of Labor nominee, Andrew Puzder, was scheduled to start January 17 but has been pushed back and may not happen until next month. It may be that worker protest is having an impact. Critics have revealed that Puzder's company has frequently violated wage and hour, and safety and health laws.

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