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Information is power. Our mission at Portside is to seek out and to provide information that empowers you -- that empowers the left. Every day we search hundreds of sources to connect you with the most interesting, striking and useful material. Just once a year we appeal to you to contribute to make it possible to continue this work. Please help.

 

 

 

Archives

For posts before June 2012, please follow these links to our archives.

Dear Miss Jeantel:

Lolita Stewart-White Heartjournalonline
Florida-based poet Lolita Stewart-White addresses the paradox of race hatred that seems never to go away.

Race and the Logic of Capital

Alan Wald Solidarity
Shortly before his death, James Baldwin wrote that in the U.S., “White is a metaphor for power,” an observation that is deep background for much of the discussion in the masterly book under review, where race and class are intertwined, yet surface differences are used to split the labor force and maintain capital’s hegemony. The book can usefully inform debate on race and class and aid in reconstructing a revolutionary project in the context of Trumpworld.

John Edgar Wideman's "Writing to Save a Life"

Charles R. Larson Counterpunch
Wideman's mixed-genre work examines the lives and legacies of the young Till, his father, Louis Till, and what they can tell us about racism and about families.

Asking for Your Help; We Made Changes to Help our Fight

Portside
Like everyone, we’ve been straining to keep up with astounding developments over the past year. We've also made a lot of changes, to create better tools to help meet the needs of the moment. So if you haven't donated yet, it's not too late.

The Food World and America's White Supremacy Problem

Tunde Wey San Francisco Chronicle
In America, white supremacy is the establishment — not part of it, but all of it, our politics, prisons, schools. And white supremacy dominates our food, our media, even our escapism.

Response

Mary Anna Dunn Tar River Poetry Review
Reflecting contemporary tensions that explode into violence, Virginia poet Mary Anna Dunn explores the failures of imagination to create resolution.

Melinda and Sandy and Oprah

Andrew O'Hagan London Review of Books
Fresh from her remarks at the Golden Globes Awards ceremony, Oprah Winfrey is being touted in the mainstream media as a potential presidential candidate in 2020. Whether it's a passing fancy or the start of a serious draft effort, now is a good time to look back on celebrity journalist Kitty Kelley's 2010 biography of Oprah, which the reviewer in an essay alternately caustic and refreshing, credits Kelley with "a very powerful understanding of what makes a modern celebrity. She gets the journey, to use a favorite Oprah word, but she also gets the cost of the journey."

Astrophysics for People in a Hurry

Josh Trapani Washington Independent Review of Books
The well-known scientist and commentator on science has presented us with a primer on his subject that is aimed at a wide and popular audience.