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For posts before June 2012, please follow these links to our archives.

Winged Words: Maxime Rodinson on the Prophet Mohammad

Tariq Ali Tariq Ali London Review of Books
With Islamophobia rife in Europe and the Western hemisphere and with France’s center and far-right parties weaponizing laicity and scapegoating refugees, it’s time for engaged readers to reacquaint themselves with Rodinson’s classic study.

Winter Counts

Julia Stein Rain Taxi
This crime novel, writes reviewer Stein, "offers a fascinating snapshot of life and Lakota culture on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota."

The 20th Century Rise of the Confederate Soybean

Mathew Roth Zocolo Public Square
Confederate generals, memorialized through the south in monuments, parks, towns, and military bases, were an available form of nostalgia for naming soybean cultivars, part of a larger pattern of systemic racism whose legacy can be felt to this day.

Myanmar Military in Pursuit of Poetry

Phyllis Klein New Verse News
As the generals imprison over 30 poets, California poet Phyllis Klein attacks the killers of poetry in Myanmar, the futility of trying to erase words with bullets.

Women’s Political Activism in Palestine

Mark Griffiths LSE Review of Books
A deep look at how Palestinian women have practiced creative and often informal forms of everyday political activism and resistance. The reviewer considers the book among the finest social scientific works on contemporary Palestine in recent years.

Black Communities Have Always Used Food as Protest

Amethyst Ganaway Food & Wine
Beginning with the Transatlantic Slave Trade, Black people in America have used food as a means of resistance, rebellion, and revolution as well as maintaining a closeness with one another through the meals they ate.