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Information is power. Our mission at Portside is to seek out and to provide information that empowers you -- that empowers the left. Every day we search hundreds of sources to connect you with the most interesting, striking and useful material. Just once a year we appeal to you to contribute to make it possible to continue this work. Please help.

Leaping with the Angels, Leaping for the People

Anthony Karefa Rogers-Wright The Leap
During a early November week-end, nearly 80 local leaders gathered at Debs Park in Los Angeles, to begin framing a justice-based vision of how the second largest city in the United States can go fossil fuel free by 2025. We brought together a spectrum of organizers from the frontlines of Indigenous rights, environmental justice, labor and food justice, and more.

As Hurricanes Bear Down, Tribes Act Quickly to Build Resilience Plans

Terri Hansen Yes! Magazine
In January, Louisiana received a $48 million grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development to move the Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw and Houma Nation tribal members to more solid ground and reestablish their communities, making tribal members the first climate change refugees in the U.S.

Paris Is Burning

James P Hare Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung
Trump's waffling, then, was not between a pro-climate agenda and an anti-climate one. Rather, the indecision was on the level of strategy on how best to dismantle environmental regulations.

The Ban Treaty Must Address the Scientifically Predicted Consequences of Nuclear War

Steven Starr Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
The research predicts that a nuclear war fought between emerging nuclear weapon states—with less than 1 percent of the explosive power contained in the global nuclear arsenals—can produce catastrophic long-term damage to global environment and weather. A war fought with 100 atomic bombs can result in the coldest average annual surface temperatures experienced in the last 1,000 years, and this prolonged cold (and drought) would last for several years.

Climate March Draws Thousands of Protesters Alarmed by Trump's Environmental Agenda

Nicholas Fandos New York Times
Billed as the Peoples Climate March, the demonstration here in Washington, and hundreds of smaller events like it across the country, had long been planned to mark the 100th day of the new president’s term. What organizers did not know, at least initially, was that that president would be Mr. Trump.

Climate Change as Genocide Inaction Equals Annihilation

Michael T. Klare TomDispatch
“We have a word for the conscious slaughter of a racial or ethnic group: genocide. For the conscious destruction of aspects of the environment: ecocide. But we don’t have a word for the conscious act of destroying the planet we live on, the world as humanity has known it. A possibility might be ‘terracide’ from the Latin word for earth. It has the right ring, given its similarity to the commonplace danger word of our era: terrorist." Tom Engelhardt, May 2013

Why "Climate Change" Must Become a Promise to Decolonize

Alycee Lane Truthout
The actions taken recently by law enforcement at the Dakota Access pipeline site have made it plain that the climate crisis cannot be adequately addressed until we come to terms with the history that climate change and the policing of communities of color share.
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