Skip to main content

White Supremacy Tried to Kill Jazz. The Music Triumphed.

Anton Woronczuk interview with Gerald Horne Truthout
In this interview, Horne describes the role of racism in the development of jazz, the gulf between its domestic and international reception; and why creativity, improvisation and technical mastery were a means of survival for its performers.

How the Worst Values of Sports Are Taking Over America

Robert Lipsyte Tom Dispatch
Say one thing about the world of sports: in some fashion, it invariably reflects developments in the larger world. It hardly matters whether the subject is war or inequality. Take a knee for a moment and think about that or, of Donald Trump....

books

Remembering the English Revolution

Daniel Johnson New Politics
A book not only for history buffs but for activists focuses on the Levellers in a history from the bottom-up that tells the story of a revolutionary mid-17th century British radical group that turned its world upside down.

From Notre Dame to Flint, Our Giving Exposes Who We Are

Wei Jia and Azadeh Shahshahani Colorlines
Authors Wei Jia and Project South’s Azadeh Shahshahani explore why the cathedral is being rebuilt by billionaires, but—five years after the water crisis began — Flint still doesn’t have safe water.

books

The Conflicted Soul of Modern Liberalism

Warren Breckman The New Republic
Tracing the history of an idea, the author charts liberalism’s two century Jekyll and Hyde existence as a credo on freedom and an ill-fitting defender of mass democracy.

books

The Soaring Writer Who Landed on His Feet

Michael Hirsch New Politics
A crime novel with a difference, this one centers on murders in a vacation town that appear to take on racial significance going back to World War Two and a segregated, elite military command.

books

Remembering Philip Roth (1933-2018)

Nathaniel Rich The New York Review of Books
An homage to the esteemed late novelist and nonfiction writer Philip Roth, who died on May 22, leaving a legacy of thick description of an American culture where, in Roth's ironic words, “everything goes and nothing matters."

tv

Anthony Bourdain Was the Best White Man

Malika Rao Vulture
Bourdain engaged without fetishizing, touristed with ease, in the way of a person who’s been toggling between identities so long, the act of meeting a stranger from a strange land is the only familiar feeling.
Subscribe to Culture