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The Massacre That Spawned the Alt-Right

Shaun Assael and Peter Keating Politico
The supremacists who emerged from the Greensboro trials understood they were free. … Free to work together to stockpile weapons, terrorize neighborhoods and commit violence up to and including murder—so long as their opponents were communists.

books

The Last Time a Wall Went Up to Keep Out Immigrants

Linda Gordon The New York Times
A new history of bigoted opposition to immigrants through the manipulation of fake science shows the most vociferous baiters of emigres in the past were among the most privileged U.S. ruling class members.

The Freedom Summer of 1964 Launched a Voting Rights Revolution

Ray Uyeda Teen Vogue
June marks the 55th anniversary of the Freedom Summer, when more than 700 college students - whose average age was 21 - traveled mostly from the North to Mississippi to work with local Black-led organizations to support their civil rights work.

The Skokie March That Wasn’t - Lessons for Today

Isaac Brosilow Jewish Currents
Skokie and the Nazis - there were massive counter-demonstrations, black and Jewish solidarity, Holocaust survivors who vowed to confront the Nazis in the streets, and a grassroots of proud, leftist Jews.This untold history offers lessons for today.

Donald Trump’s Takeover of the Republican Party is Now Complete

Zach Carter Huffington Post
A Neo-Confederate victory in Tuesday’s primary indicates a frightening direction for the GOP. Stewart isn’t just a Virginia problem. He’s an American problem. Unabashedly pro-Confederate, he allied with violent white nationalists in Charlottesville.

books

Klan 2.0: Some 'Good People'

Scott McLemee Inside Higher Ed
In The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition, Linda Gordon emphasizes broad patterns, making the book more timely than even the headlines of white nationalist outpourings the past months would suggest, writes Scott McLemee. What stands out in Gordon’s book is that the Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s tried to create a world unto itself through spectacle, mass communications and branding.

books

Klan 2.0

Scott McLemee Inside Higher Ed
This new book reminds us of the scope and power of the second incarnation of the Ku Klux Klan, beginning a century ago. As reviewer Scott McLemee points out, however, to only point out the Klan's racist heritage can be deceptively simplistic. McLemee reminds us that what made the Klan a mass force in the 1920s was that the movement's reactionary politics and racist passions "were widespread enough to count as mainstream.'

A College and Klan Traditions

Scott Jaschik Inside Higher Ed
Numerous colleges and universities in the last decade have studied and acknowledged the role of slavery in building and running their campuses, or financing the institutions. Other colleges have changed the names of buildings that honored people with ties to the Ku Klux Klan.
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