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labor

Americans Are Starting to Love Unions Again

Meagan Day Jacobin
Labor union approval is now higher than at nearly any point in the last 50 years. The reasons: shit pay, teacher strikes, and Bernie Sanders.

Tidbits - Sept. 5, 2019 - Reader Comments: Case for Impeachment; Climate Strike; Tax Scam; State of Labor Unions; Sara Nelson; Ilhan Omar; Bernie Sanders; Amazon Fires; German Greens; Puerto Rico; Cuba Tourism; Protest Songs; Resources, Announcements

Portside
Reader Comments: Case for Impeachment; Climate Strike; Tax Scam; State of Labor Unions; Sara Nelson; Ilhan Omar; Bernie Sanders; Amazon Fires; German Greens; Puerto Rico; Cuba Tourism; Protest Songs; Resources, Announcements; more...

5 Reasons for Workers to Celebrate This Labor Day

Rebecca Burns Working In These Times
The U.S. labor movement is under siege by powerful anti-union forces, including the Trump administration. But with approval of unions at a 15-year high, and a wave of labor militancy on the rise, working people have plenty to celebrate.

Who Wants to Join a Union? A Growing Number of Americans

Thomas Kochan, Duanyi Yang, Erin L. Kelly, Will Kimball The Conversation
U.S. workers have not given up on unions-a survey of the workforce found interest in joining unions to be at a four-decade high. But few workers who don’t belong to unions will get to join one, since fewer than 1% will experience an organizing drive.

labor

Labor, Movement and Change

Gwen McKinney Huffington Post
Trump is one of the manifestations of national discontent. To his slogan “Make America Great Again” my response – as a tribute to Labor and working people – draws from one of our truly great Americans, Langston Hughes, who proclaimed “Let America be America Again! Let it be the dream it used to be. Let it be the pioneer on the plain, seeking a home where he himself is free. (America never was America to me.)”

Widening the Tent for a Multiracial Labor Movement

Barbara Ransby Chicago Reporter
Since the early 1900s and before, Black workers have not viewed labor unions and labor organizing as separate from the rest of their lives and have fought for union politics that reflect that understanding.

A Louisville Union Built its Strength as Blacks, Whites Took on International Harvester

Toni Gilpin LEO Weekly
This “constant campaign” carried into the community as well, with Local 236 at the forefront of battles in the late 1940s and early 1950s to desegregate Louisville. But to Jim Wright, perhaps the FE’s biggest impact came at the personal level, as those whites who had come into the Harvester plant as “real racists” became friends with black workers there.

poetry

A Dream of Quitting Time

David Salner Beloit Poetry Journal
For the Labor Day holiday, David Salner offers a poet’s glimpse of what it feels like not to be working while working a long shift at night.
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