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Eduardo Galeano: Not So Elementary, My Dear Watson

Eduardo Galeano tomdispatch.com
The Life and Death of Words, People, and Even Nature: From Walking Libraries and a God Named “Word” to What Sherlock Holmes Never Said. Passages excerpted from Eduardo Galeano’s new book, Children of the Days: A Calendar of Human History (Nation Books).

How Eco-Fiction Became Realer Than Realism

Lynne Feeley The Nation
Encompassing everything from the ecosystems novel to sci-fi, a growing body of literature is imagining and interrogating the past, present, and future of the planet's climate.

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Severance: A Novel

Chris Brooks Facebook
The story is full of very relatable pandemic moments: workers questioning whether it’s safe to go to work or whether they should stay home, streets suddenly emptied, N-95 masks. What makes this all so remarkable is that it was published in 2018...

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Olga Dies Dreaming

Chris Brooks Facebook post
It’s a surreal experience to read a work of fiction that literally takes everything happening in my neighborhood and turns it into a sweeping epic about Zapatista-inspired guerrilla movements fighting for Puerto Rican liberation

Alice Walker Has ‘No Regrets’

Elizabeth A. Harris New York Times
Alice Walker is often an autobiographical writer, even in her fiction; the main character in “The Color Purple,” Celie, is based on her grandmother. Now, by publishing her journals, she has invited the world into some of her most private moments.

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How Creative Writing Programs De-Politicized Fiction

Annie Levin Current Affairs
In the shadow of the Cold War, the rise of creative writing programs and ‘show don’t tell’ philosophy drained fiction of its political bite. Author Sandra Cisneros, writing about her college program said: How can art make a difference was never asked
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