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Protests in Iran Took Many by Surprise — But Not Iranian Labor Activists

Murtaza Hussain The Intercept
Tens of thousands of people in dozens of cities across Iran have braved bullets and tear gas in a public outpouring of dissent against the country’s ruling establishment. These protests appear to have originated in working-class conservative cities and towns that the Islamic Republic likes to depict as its core constituency. Iranian labor activists has long expected such an outbreak of discontent from the economically disadvantaged people in these areas.

What Ireland Can Teach Europe

Conn Hallinan Foreign Policy in Focus
Europeans who think the current crisis is unique forget that between 1845 and 1848, 1.5 to 2 million Irish fled their famine-blackened land (while another million or more starved to death) in large part due to the same kind of economics Europe is currently trying to force on countries like Ireland, Portugal, Italy, Greece, Spain, and Cyprus. Today, the migrants are from Syria, Somalia, Yemen, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya, but the policies are the same.

books

What Is Great about Ourselves

Pankaj Mishra London Review of Books
Five books by neoliberal authors extolling glories that never were, the essayist eviscerates a state of mind that flatters a cosmopolitan liberal tolerance that has been more at home with nationalism, imperialism and even racism and a worldview that presupposes a chasm between civilized whites and uncivilized nonwhites. even accusing leftists of enabling racism by such affronts as squashing alleged dissimilar people together on buses, trains and subway cars.

It’s Not Only Necessary to Develop an Alternative to Globalization — It’s Entirely Possible

Walden Bellow Foreign Policy in Focus
It was the left who diagnosed the ills of globalization. So why is the right eating our lunch? Today global capitalism is in a period of long-term stagnation following the global financial crisis. The newer protests represent a far broader disenchantment with capitalism than the protests of the 2000s. The building blocks of an alternative economic model are there - sustainable development, de-growth, and de-globalization.

What's Next for the French Left?

Cole Stangler The Nation
There is no denying it: The last few months have been disastrous for the French left. As the gospel of neoliberalism goes up in flames across the Channel, French voters have handed over the republic to one of its true believers. These will be trying times for the French working class, and really anyone concerned with the country's collective well-being. Macron's electoral success does not equate with a broad democratic mandate for his policies.

Why Millennials Aren't Afraid of Socialism

Julia Mead The Nation
It's an old idea, but the people who will make it happen are young - and tired of the unequal world they've inherited. I will come of age in the era of Trump. It's a bleak generational landmark, but ideological capitulation and despair are not the answer. In the 1930s and 1940s, many of the most dedicated antifascists were communists. The antidote to radical exploitation and exclusion is radical egalitarianism and inclusion.

If Progressives Want to Defeat Trump, They Must Win Back Workers

Les Leopold Common Dreams
It's not ok for corporations to pack up and leave. We should have some control over our economic lives and not leave all the crucial decisions to Wall Street and their corporate puppets. Trade deals are bad deals unless they enforce the highest health, safety, environmental and labor standards. The race to the bottom is real and must stop. We need to recapture the job outsourcing issue and rekindle the flames that ignited Occupy Wall Street and the Sanders campaign.

The President's House Is Empty

Bonnie Honig Boston Review
In November Donald Trump announced that his family will not live in the White House when he is inaugurated. Trump's announcement has implications for all of us. Who will pay for the security required for Trump's New York-based family? Who will bear the costs of the disruptions caused by frequent presidential flights to and from New York, not to mention the motorcades in and out of midtown Manhattan? The answer is: taxpayers or, as we used to be called, the public.
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