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Myths about Teachers: We Need More Police in Our Schools

Bill Ayers, Crystal Laura, Rick Ayers Praxis Center
In “You Can’t Fire the Bad Ones“: And 18 Other Myths about Teachers, educators Bill Ayers, Crystal Laura and Rick Ayers flip the script on many enduring and popular myths about teachers, teachers’ unions, and education that permeate our culture. By unpacking these myths, the authors aim to challenge readers to rethink their assumptions about teachers. Praxis Center shares an excerpt from Myth 16: Teachers Are Unable to Deal Adequately with the Disciplinary Challenges Posed By Today’s Youth, and We Need More Police in Our Public School Buildings to Do the Job and Maintain Law and Order.

California Police Worked With Neo-Nazis

Sam Levin The Guardian
Officers expressed sympathy with white supremacists and sought their help to target counter-protesters after a violent 2016 rally, according to court documents

books

Police are the Problem, Not the Solution

Michael Hirsch The Indypendent
The author argues convincingly and in graphic detail that the problem with police in civil society is not just the lack of adequate training, police diversity, increased militarization or even police methods such as the routine brutalization of many people of color, but the dramatic and unprecedented expansion in the last four decades of the too-accepted social role of police. The problem, the sociologist-author insists, is policing itself.

Kap, Cops and Confederate Statues: A Better World Without Double Standards

Frank Serpico CounterPunch
Frank Serpico, who testified against NYPD police corruption in 1972, joined more than 100 African American uniformed officers who demonstrated at a rally supporting NFL player Colin Kaepernick's objections to police abuse and inequality. "Kaepernick was not disrespecting the flag or our vets. I believe that Kaepernick was protesting a corrupt system of justice that allows some police to use excessive force, even the taking of innocent life, without consequences"

Police Unions, Police Officers, and Police Abolition

Rosa Squillacote Portside
Abolition of the carceral state is a fundamental political goal for the Left today: specifically, abolishing the carceral state’s logic and institutions. . Abolition is both a goal and a discourse: it informs the strategies we adopt, as well as the framework we use to critique the carceral state and describe alternatives.

tv

Marque Richardson on His Big Episode of Dear White People and How Art Can Be Activism

Jackson McHenry Vulture
In the wrenching fifth episode of the series, Reggie gets into a fight with a white character who uses the N-word at a party, then winds up held at gunpoint by the campus police. As Richardson explained, the episode, which was directed by Moonlight’s Barry Jenkins, rejiggered the structure of the show and forced the writers to figure out a new way forward.

Its' Not Just Racism, but also Militarization at the Heart of Police Brutality

Jeremy Kuzmarov Huffington Post
The militarization of American police forces goes back a long way. During the Cold War, American police advisers tasked with training their proteges in clandestine surveillance and to assist in counterinsurgency operations in countries like Vietnam came back to advance methods domestically that devalued civil liberties, contributing to the trend towards militarization.
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