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Portside aims to provide material of interest to people on the left that will help them to interpret the world and to change it.

labor

2017: The Canadian Labour movement in review

Gerard Di Trolio RankandFile.ca
Unions in Canada suffered some setbacks in 2017. However, movements like the Fight for $15 and Fairness show a potential way ahead. In 2018, those looking to renew the labor movement need to build power from below, encourage greater membership involvement, forge international solidarity, and confront governments, even those that are ostensibly friendly.

labor

‘I Hope I Can Quit Working in a Few Years’: A Preview of the U.S. Without Pensions

Peter Whoriskey The Washington Post
The way major U.S. companies provide for retiring workers has been shifting for about three decades, with more dropping traditional pensions every year. The first full generation of workers to retire since this turn offers a sobering preview of a labor force more and more dependent on their own savings for retirement.

labor

American Workers Need Better Job Protections

Moshe Z. Marvit and Shaun Richman New York Times
Just cause — a legal right to your job — should be an essential part of any package of reforms to restore workplace dignity and fairness.

labor

2017 Year in Review: Turning Lemons into Lemonade

Alexandra Bradbury, Samantha Winslow Labor Notes
Labor still has the power to throw sand in the gears of exploitation. The next step is for all these disparate troublemakers to start seeing their workplace struggles—from defending pensions to defending refugees—as part of the same bigger movement.

labor

German Union Steps Up Fight for ‘Modern’ 28-Hour Workweek

Michelle Fitzpatrick with Isabelle Le Page Industry Week
Thanks to strong bargaining power, the IG Metall union, which represents some 3.9 million workers in the metal and electrical industries, is pushing for a 6% wage increase and a 28-hour week for a two-year period — with limited impact on wages.

labor

#SaveTPS: A Working-Class Struggle

Jessica F. Chilin-Hernández Working-Class Perspectives
The morning after, I felt a fear unlike any I had felt before. The right side of my chest hurt, my stomach felt strange. I was hungry, but couldn’t bring myself to eat. I could just think of one thing: if Donald Trump’s DHS Secretary does not approve our renewals, then we’d potentially be forced to return El Salvador. As of today, I have 81 days left on my TPS work permit if the designation isn’t renewed by DHS.

labor

When Deregulation is Deadly

Bryant Simon The Gender Policy Report
On September 3, 1991, the Imperial Food Products plant in Hamlet, North Carolina burst into flames. Twenty-five people died, trapped behind the locked doors of the red-brick factory. Most of the victims were women; many were women of color, most were single moms. Another sixty people were injured, and the blast left more than fifty children orphaned. Local officials called the fire an accident, but the women and men who worked at Imperial had been made vulnerable by the factory’s owners as well as public policy.

labor

Trump’s Triumph, Labor Resistance?

Peter Olney New Labor Forum
The election of Donald Trump produced a rash of commentaries heralding the death of organized labor, or at minimum an existential crisis. Although these epitaphs are not new and are very overblown, it is true that organized labor prematurely backed the corporate Democrat, failed to elect the candidate it did back, and is left divided over how to deal with the presidency of Donald Trump.
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