Skip to main content

Rhiannon Giddens and What Folk Music Means

John Jeremiah Sullivan The New Yorker
Rhiannon Giddens's multicultural background has presented particular challenges of self-definition. She is an artist of color who plays and records what she describes as "black non-black music," reviving a forgotten history.

books

Henry Louis Gates Jr. on the ‘Stony Road’ for Black Americans

David Luhrssen Shepherd Express (Milwaukee)
The highly regarded scholar's latest work tackles the deep roots of white nationalism as it emerged from conflicts surrounding Reconstruction and the failure of post-Civil War governments to stamp down racism and secure genuine emancipation.

Building Memphis For All

April Freeman and Bennett Foster interviewed by Mary Jo Connelly Organizing Upgrade
Memphis For All is fighting to build a different kind of city and state, one that is run for and by all of us. We need an economy that works for all of us, instead of one rigged for corporations; we need a legal system that treats everyone fairly...

theater

The Play’s the Thing

Peter Olney and Gene Bruskin Stansbury Forum
New play, about Reconstruction. This was really a turning point in US history when America almost did the right thing. The South was writing new state constitutions and African Americans were getting elected to local and national offices.

books

There Is a Scottsboro in Every Country

Amanda Reid Public Books
Two books look to the histories of the Communist International and the Tricontinental movement to evaluate how organizing around color and region can effect global struggles against oppression and grow in tandem with multiracial workers’ movements.

The Greensboro Sit-In Protests, Explained

Eric Ginsburg Teen Vogue
February 1 marked the 59th anniversary of the start of the Greensboro sit-ins, a protest started in 1960 by four college students against racial segregation in Greensboro, North Carolina. Their actions quickly spurred a nationwide movement.

books

Fighting to Vote

Michael Tomasky The New York Review of Books
As results from the recent midterm elections show and the book under review chronicles, restrictive voter identification laws, registration requirements, felon disenfranchisement and voter purges still deny millions access to the ballot box.

Medicaid Work Requirements Would Worsen South's Health Care Crisis

Rebekah Barber Facing South
USA map showing work requirements states Experts say Medicaid work requirements will create more problems than solutions, two Southern states — Arkansas and Kentucky — have already been granted federal approval to begin implementing them. These states', among the nation's poorest, work requirements could push thousands into coverage gaps.

New Challenges for the Disputed Atlantic Coast Pipeline

Sue Sturgis Facing South
photo of bumble bee The proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline, which would carry fracked gas 600 miles from West Virginia to North Carolina and possibly points farther south, has been hit with setbacks in recent weeks that raise questions about its future.
Subscribe to South