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books

The Color Line: W.E.B. Du Bois at the 1900 Paris Exposition

Annette Gordon-Reed New York Review of Books
W.E.B. Du Bois’s exhibit at the 1900 Paris Exposition offered him a chance to present a “graphical narrative” of the dramatic gains made by Black Americans since the end of slavery.

Outlawing the Truth

Adam Sanchez The Progressive
Three things that could become illegal in my Philadelphia classroom if Pennsylvania House Bill 1532 becomes law: analyzing the original text of the U.S. Constitution, reading Martin Luther King Jr.’s writing, and discussing inequitable school funding

The Sounds of Struggle

Michael Reagan Boston Review
Sixty years ago, a pathbreaking jazz album from Max Roach, Abbey Lincoln, and Oscar Brown, Jr., fused politics and art in the fight for Black liberation. Today many Black artists—women at the forefront—are taking similar strides.

food

Black Communities Have Always Used Food as Protest

Amethyst Ganaway Food & Wine
Beginning with the Transatlantic Slave Trade, Black people in America have used food as a means of resistance, rebellion, and revolution as well as maintaining a closeness with one another through the meals they ate.

Why Paul Robeson’s Voice Still Rings True Today

Tayo Aluko The Progressive
Those who desecrated the Capitol in January called themselves patriots. Millions supported them, including members of both Houses. This again reminded one of Robeson, because seventy-two years earlier, another angry mob might well have lynched him.
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