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Illinois Governor's Race On Pace To Be Most Expensive in U.S. History

Tim Jones Better Government Association
In what may seem a paradox, the worse off Illinois government gets the more the wealthy are willing to spend to gain control. It is part of a national trend that has seen ever escalating spending battles for even down the ballot offices. Down the ballot, a $1 million legislative race in Illinois used to be an oddity. Last year 23 topped $1 million, with five between $5 million and $6 million, according to Redfield’s analysis of state campaign finance records.

Because Scott Walker Asked . . .

Ed Pilkington and the Guardian US interactive team The Guardian
Leaked court documents from ‘John Doe investigation’ in Wisconsin lay bare pervasive influence of corporate cash on modern US elections

books

Dark Money The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right

Greg Waldmann Open Letters Monthly
One of the cornerstones of the campaign Senator Bernie Sanders is waging for the presidency is his opposition to our corrupt campaign finance laws. He often names the Koch brothers as a prime exhibit of the dangers of unregulated big money in politics, and for good reason. In her new book, Jane Mayer traces how the Koch brothers are trying to buy our politics. Greg Waldmann introduces us to what Mayer has found.

Hillary and Bernie: The Credibility Gap

Robert Borosage Campaign for America's Future
The Clinton campaign has aggressively sought campaign donations from the biggest financial interests and Clinton has personally taken millions of dollars in speaking fees from Wall Street and the health care industry. Meanwhile, Sanders has generated enough true popular excitement and small donations to be financially competitive at a presidential level.

Have We Hit Peak Inequality?

Chuck Collins Other Words
These 400 billionaires have greater wealth than 190 million of their fellow Americans put together.

Illinois’ Political Odd Couple: Rauner and Rahm

Curtis Black Chicago Reporter
On one issue—and it’s the most fundamental issue—Rauner and Emanuel stand arm-in-arm. Both oppose the kind of progressive revenue solutions that would target the millionaire class to which they belong and which they represent—the kind of solutions that offer the only realistic path out of the fiscal crisis in which the state and city are mired.
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