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Information is power. Our mission at Portside is to seek out and to provide information that empowers you -- that empowers the left. Every day we search hundreds of sources to connect you with the most interesting, striking and useful material. Just once a year we appeal to you to contribute to make it possible to continue this work. Please help.

 

 

 

Martin Luther King’s “Call to Conscience” “Beyond Vietnam”

Heather Gray Justice Initiative
Martin Luther King, Jr.’s speech against the Vietnam War on April 4, 1967 at Riverside Church in New York one of the most profound and important speeches in American history. Without question, King’s speech in April helped to energize the anti-war movement and, through his profound moral analysis, in defining the degenerate role of the US in that war. It also helped to topple a sitting U.S. president - a profound lesson for us today.

labor

The New Workers, and New Militancy, of the Seventies

Justin Miller The American Prospect
During the 1970s women and people of color were organizing their workplaces at impressive rates — they just weren’t winning. Lane Windham in her new book recounts that history and its consequences.

Tidbits - October 12, 2017 - Reader Comments: Vietnam and Anti-War Movement; Support for Kaepernick; Lin-Manuel Miranda - Almost Like Praying-for Puerto Rico; Mobilization to Stop Trump War on North Korea; Announcements; and more.....

Portside
Reader Comments: Vietnam - The War, Burns Film, and the Anti-War Movement; Four-Star General Supports Kaepernick; 'Sonic Attack' in Cuba?; Trump as Modern Mussolini; Lin-Manuel Miranda - Almost Like Praying - for Puerto Rico; National Mobilization to Stop Trump War on North Korea; Announcements; and more.....

Anti-Fascism and Racial Struggle in Song

Meredith Holmgren Smithsonian Folkways Recordings
The events that unfolded last month in Charlottesville, Virginia, when neo-fascist protests against the removal of a Confederate monument escalated to the deaths of three persons, have stirred nationwide debate about the history of fascism and white supremacy. The music from Smithsonian Folkways' large collection also forces us to consider how musicians have historically responded to fascism and white supremacy.

Colin Kaepernick’s Protest is Part of a Patriotic Tradition; Protesters Plan to Block Traffic Outside Rams Opener

Jesse Jackson; Dennis Romero Chicago Sun-Times
Colin Kaepernick, the former quarterback of the San Francisco 49ers, is being blackballed — itself a revealing phrase — from the National Football League with the collusion of the all-white owners. He is ostracized because a year ago he exercised his First Amendment right to free speech by taking a knee during the playing of the national anthem, as a symbol of protest against police shootings of unarmed African-American men.

books

Class & Inequality: The Book that Explains Charlottesville

Marshall Steinbaum Boston Review
The University of Virginia has long been a bastion of white supremacy and its validating scholarship. The book’s author identifies how such antidemocratic sentiment has long gestated in academia generally, encapsulated in neoclassical economics and its validation of alleged rational economic behaviors -- theories that originated in opposition to the New Deal and the Civil Rights movement and predominate in today's conservative and far-right movements today.

Dolores Huerta Documentary Opens September 1

Latino Rebels; Sharis Delgadillo
Dolores Huerta has contributed to movements for union rights and social justice since the of the United Farm Workers (UFW). Working with Cesar Chavez, Philip Vera Cruz and others, she helped found what became the UFW. Today, now 86, she works in supporting union democracy, civic engagement and empowerment of women and youth in disadvantaged communities. The UFW changed the nature of labor organizing in the Southwest contributing to the growth of Latino politics in the US

The Rebellion in Newark

Junius Williams New Jersey Monthly
In the summer of 1967, the streets of Newark exploded in violence. Here is a first-hand account of the tragic events that changed the city, and the country forever. Newark’s population is still exceedingly low income. Crime, gang warfare, drugs, joblessness and failing schools are still facts of life in some Newark neighborhoods. But the cultures of many ethnic groups continue to lift the spirit of its many peoples. Increasingly, Newark is a good place to call home.

Review: “I Am Not Your Negro”

Ernie Tate The Bullet
Through a very clever and subtle weaving together of archival footages, interviews, stereotypic images from racist advertizing from the thirties and forties, and from contemporary TV, we are provided with a historical context and an incredible graphic depiction of the momentous civil rights movement that swept the American south in those years, the lunch-counter sit-ins, the courageous fight to integrate the educational system, the voter registration drives, ...
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