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Celia Sánchez Manduley: The Most Famous Woman You Have Never Heard Of

Tiffany A. Sippial History News Network
Sánchez was the highest ranking, most revered woman within the Cuban revolutionary government. She earned the status of “first guerrilla of the Sierra Maestra,” as Fidel Castro’s primary confidant, and as the Cuban Revolution’s staunchest loyalist.

How Cuban Art Fed Africa's Liberation Struggles

BBC News BBC
An exhibition of Cuban propaganda posters and magazines in London shows the support Fidel Castro gave to African liberation movements during the Cold War. The works were produced by 33 designers, many of them women.

160 Americans To Take Protest Trip To Cuba

Venceremos Brigade Venceremos Brigade
demonstrators holding Venceremos Brigade banner Brigadistas will return to the U.S. to educate their communities about the realities seen and experienced in Cuba, and to advocate for the end of the blockade and travel ban, the return of occupied Guantánamo Bay, and truly normal relations.

books

Women and the Cuban Insurrection

Jennifer Triplett H-LatAm (Humanities and Social Sciences Online)
This study "is a thoroughly engaging and much-needed contribution to a gendered understanding of the Cuban Revolution in particular and of armed conflict in general," says reviewer Triplett.

When Fidel Castro Charmed the United States

Tony Perrottet Smithsonian Magazine
Sixty years ago this month, the romantic victory of the young Cuban revolutionaries amazed the world—and led to a surreal evening on “The Ed Sullivan Show”

books

A Memoir of Life as Che Guevara’s Kid Brother

Peter Canby The New Yorker
Che’s youngest sibling, Juan Martin Guevara, remembers his revolutionary brother and the family's travails after his murder by the Bolivian military with the aid of the CIA.

books

Terror in the French Revolution and Today

Samuel Farber International Socialist Review
The author argues that the Terror of the French Revolution was a price worth paying, and that the lessons from overthrowing the old regime should temper today's trend of maligning oppressed people's resort to violence as itself a rationale for ongoing class injustices. The reviewer, no critic of revolutionary struggle, argues that the author overemphasizes the pursuit of vengeance then and now involved at the expense of politics and a weighing of class forces.
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