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Learning From King’s Last Campaign

Jessicah Pierre Otherwords
Before he died, Martin Luther King, Jr. joined a campaign to unify working people of all races. Today, nothing could be more powerful.

Tidbits - Dec. 5, 2019 - Reader Comments: Economy Not Fine, Half Work Low-Wage Jobs; Reparations; Chicago Teachers Strike Lessons; UAW GM Strike Was Significant; Resources: Bullies in Blue; Multicultural Children's Books; "I Am Troy Davis"; more

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Reader Comments: Economy Not Fine, Half Work Low-Wage Jobs; Reparations; Centrist Dems; Work at Amazon; Chicago Teachers Strike Lessons; UAW GM Strike Was Significant; Resources: Bullies in Blue; Multicultural Children's Books; "I Am Troy Davis"....

Class Prejudice and the Democrats’ Blue Wave?

Jack Metzgar Working-Class Perspectives
The exclusive focus on suburbs as if they are wall-to-wall white middle-class professionals supports a Democratic political strategy that wants to run against Trump’s offensive style and values rather than on a substantive economic-justice program...

The Young MLK Already Had Socialist Ideas

Lynn Parramore Institute for New Economic Thinking
A new book argues that King’s suspicion of American capitalism and his passion for economic justice did not represent a turn in his last tumultuous years. They were there all along.

Bonds of Memory and the Fight for Economic Justice

Michael Honey Commercial Appeal
Sanitation workers marching in Memphis threatened by national guards. The bonds of memory and today’s vast disparities in wealth and well-being tell us that we must continue the struggle launched by workers and by King in the spring of 1968. Today, more people live in poverty in America than in 1968. Now as then, the majority of the poor are “white” but poverty’s heaviest concentration is among people of color, especially young people and women. Poverty exists in part because most of the new jobs in Memphis, as in America, do not pay a living wage.

GOP Tax Plan Is Igniting a Movement for a Moral Economy

Sarah Anderson Other Words
On December 4, prominent faith leaders announced plans for one of the largest waves of civil disobedience in U.S. history. Dubbed the “Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival,” this effort will mark the 50th anniversary of a similar initiative in 1968 that was undercut by the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King.

Racism May Have Gotten Us Into This Mess, But Identity Politics Can’t Get Us Out

Briahna Joy Gray New York Magazine
It’s often argued that centering economics means abandoning racial or other identity groups that have fought hard for well-deserved political leverage. But political messaging is not a zero-sum game. The question is not “identity politics or economic justice,” but how to adopt a complementary union of the two.

Ensuring Equality for All Californians in the Workplace

Los Angeles Black Worker Center Los Angeles Black Worker Center
Discrimination has created a crisis in the Black community. Although the passage of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act forbids racial discrimination in the workplace, black workers continue to face higher rates of discrimination in the workforce than white workers do. ‘Whether working full-time or part-time, Black workers earn only three-quarters of what white workers earn,’ as stated in the introduction of the brief.
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