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Bonds of Memory and the Fight for Economic Justice

Michael Honey Commercial Appeal
Sanitation workers marching in Memphis threatened by national guards. The bonds of memory and today’s vast disparities in wealth and well-being tell us that we must continue the struggle launched by workers and by King in the spring of 1968. Today, more people live in poverty in America than in 1968. Now as then, the majority of the poor are “white” but poverty’s heaviest concentration is among people of color, especially young people and women. Poverty exists in part because most of the new jobs in Memphis, as in America, do not pay a living wage.

GOP Tax Plan Is Igniting a Movement for a Moral Economy

Sarah Anderson Other Words
On December 4, prominent faith leaders announced plans for one of the largest waves of civil disobedience in U.S. history. Dubbed the “Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival,” this effort will mark the 50th anniversary of a similar initiative in 1968 that was undercut by the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King.

Racism May Have Gotten Us Into This Mess, But Identity Politics Can’t Get Us Out

Briahna Joy Gray New York Magazine
It’s often argued that centering economics means abandoning racial or other identity groups that have fought hard for well-deserved political leverage. But political messaging is not a zero-sum game. The question is not “identity politics or economic justice,” but how to adopt a complementary union of the two.

Ensuring Equality for All Californians in the Workplace

Los Angeles Black Worker Center Los Angeles Black Worker Center
Discrimination has created a crisis in the Black community. Although the passage of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act forbids racial discrimination in the workplace, black workers continue to face higher rates of discrimination in the workforce than white workers do. ‘Whether working full-time or part-time, Black workers earn only three-quarters of what white workers earn,’ as stated in the introduction of the brief.

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Women Hold the Keys to New Working-Class Prosperity

Lane Windham Working-Class Perspectives
A newly-mobilized working class could reshape the nation’s economic and political landscape. Women are the core of today's working-class, and that’s why women’s leadership – – especially among women of color — will be critical for that new working-class movement tp take shape.

A New Way to Close the Gender Pay Gap

Martha Burk OtherWords
Pay discrimination based on sex has been illegal since the Equal Pay Act was passed way back in 1963. Still, the pay gap remains at 22 cents on the dollar for full-time, year-round work, and it hasn’t moved in over a decade. At that pace the gap won’t close until 2059, according to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. African-American women won’t meet the benchmark until August. Native American women must wait until September. And Latino women until November.

A Viable Billionaire Tax?

Josh Hoxie Inequality.org
New paper makes the case that a global billionaire tax is ethical, good for growth, and could solve a lot of the world’s problems. Oh and politically viable.

Paying for Low-Wage Pollution

Liz Ryan Murray OtherWords
Economic justice activists are championing laws that shift the costs of toxic poverty wages from communities to corporations.

Beyond Legal Protections, Disability Rights Advocates Seek Economic Progress

Curtis Black Chicago Reporter
Disabled people tend to live in the poorest areas with much less access to jobs and good education. There are a lot of obstacles. It’s the kind of social issue that isn’t being addressed -- when we talk about poverty, we don’t talk about people with disabilities.
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