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Organize and Fight for the Freedom of All Refugees and Migrants!

Nikole Cababa, Secretary General of BAYAN USA Bayan USA
demonstrators We are in the worst refugee crisis the world has ever seen with 69 million refugees fleeing their homelands, and each day worsens as millions are forced to migrate not by choice, but as a result of the neoliberal policies and free trade agreements t

The Radical Roots of the Great Grape Strike

David Bacon The Reality Check
Mythology has hidden the true history of how and why the great grape strike started, especially its connection to some of the most radical movements in the country's labor history. After 50 years that silence is lifting. Dawn Mabalon, a history professor at San Francisco State University, has documented the radical career of Larry Itliong, who headed the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC), one of the two organizations that carried out the 1965 strike.

What Cesar Chavez Movie Missed

David Bacon In These Times
The new film, Cesar Chavez: History is Made One Step at a Time, doesn't capture the diversity of the farmworkers' movement. "When I was a farmworker, before the strike, we lived in different worlds - the Latino world, the Filipino world, the African-American world and the Caucasian world," Eliseo Medina as interviewed by David Bacon for In These Times.

Tidbits - May 15, 2014

Portside
Reader Comments-Fast-food strikes; Cecily McMillan; Campus Unions; Vietnam War; Farley Mowat; Ukraine; Power of Imagination; Filipino Americans and Farm Labor Movement; BDS; Food; William Worthy - R.I.P Announcements - Strike! & New Forms of Worker Struggle -May 28; Bold New Era or Hard Times for Organized Labor? -June 4; Organizing 2.0 Conference -June 6-7; The Origins of Inequality: Grassroots Economics Training for Understanding & Power -June 14 (all New York)

Filipino Americans and the Farm Labor Movement

Angelo Lopez angelolopez.wordpress.com
The movie, Cesar Chavez, documents his life and his role in the 1965 Delano Grape Strike. An aspect of the film is the largely forgotten contributions of Filipino Americans to the farm labor movement. Since the 1920s, when Filipinos first learned to organize into unions in Hawaii, Filipinos were important leaders in organizing farmworkers to fight against unfair working conditions.

Larry Itliong - Forgotten Filipino Labor Leader Initiated 60's Grape Strike

Patricia Leigh Brown New York Times
In 1965, the year his father and 1,000 field laborers - the first wave of Filipinos to the United States, known as manongs - began the grape strike that set the stage for the boycott that would lead Cesar Chavez and thousands of farmworker families to create the nation's pioneering agricultural labor union, the United Farm Workers...On Sept. 8, 1965, Filipino farm workers organized by Mr.Itliong crowded into the Filipino Community Hall, where Filipino elders still gather
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