Skip to main content

They Are Concentration Camps — and They Are Also Prisons

Maya Schenwar & Kelly Hayes Truthout
We must hold these dual, overlapping realities in our minds, as we strive to comprehend the interrelated horrors to which the United States — not just Trump, but the United States — subjects millions of people every day.

Reports: Lies, Chaos and Abuse at ICE Contractor Lockup

Robin Urevich Capital & Main
USA flag seen through barbed wire Immigrant-detainee suicides indicate that the Stewart Detention Center and ICE are out of step with a trend in corrections to keep seriously mentally ill people out of solitary confinement.

No More Compromises: We Need Immigration Amnesty Now

David L. Wilson Truthout
Donald Trump’s policy of family separation at the borders motivated an upsurge in activism, including widespread calls to abolish ICE. Now it’s time to go further, to attack the long-standing policy of separating families inside our borders.

Dr. Ruth, Dr. Kissinger, and Trump’s Cruelty to Families

George Packer The New Yorker
The increasingly routine consequence of the Trump Administration’s immigration policy to separate children from parents who enter the United States without papers reminded me of a conversation I heard between Henry Kissinger and Ruth K. Westheimer.

Conditions Worsen for ICE Detainees Following Hunger Strike

Robin Urevich Capital & Main
Conditions at Adelanto Detention Center, a privately operated prison currently used to detain undocumented immigrants, are said to be grim. Nine detainees, all of whom came to the U.S. seeking asylum, were so fed up that they staged a hunger strike. Guards responded with violence and pepper spray.

‘If You Don’t Want Us, Tell Us To Go Back’: The Making of a California Prison Town

Sarah Tory, High Country News High Country News
Adelanto, a town of 32,000, is home to three prisons. This was not a coincidence. With a history of agriculture, excessive water use, the Great Depression, cheap vacant land filled with a military base which closed in the 1990s, Adelanto turned to prisons. During the 1980s, under increasingly stringent drug laws and harsh sentencing policies, demand for new prisons had grown. So had the belief that prisons could nourish economic development in rural communities.

books

Stripping Away Invisibility: Exploring the Architecture of Detention

Victoria Law Monthly Review
Like the people within, immigrant detention centers are often invisible as well. Photos and drawings of these places are rarely public; access is even more limited. Canada has three designated immigrant prisons, and it also rents beds in government-run prisons to house over one-third of its detainees. Undocumented: The Architecture of Migrant Detention begins to strip away at this invisibility.
Subscribe to immigrant detention