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The Wire and the World

Helena Sheehan, Sheamus Sweeney Jacobin
A decade ago, The Wire series finale aired. The show was a Marxist's idea of what TV drama should be.


50 Years Later: Who Still Rules America?

Randy Shaw Beyond Chron
On the 50th anniversary of G. William Domhoff’s Who Rules America, the author and 11 others take stock of the book’s findings about class and power in the United States, focusing on the drive to privatize public schools, extend power abroad...


Review: When Karl Marx Was Young And Dashing

Michael Hirsch The Indypendent
Raoul Peck’s The Young Karl Marx is the best buddy movie since George Roy Hill’s Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid in 1969. It’s also among the most important films in decades, bringing to a mass audience not just the revolutionary ideas of Marx and his friend and collaborator Frederick Engels in the early days of modern capitalism, but an approach to politics and history that still has no peer.


Marxism as ‘Organized Sarcasm’

Richard Seymour Salvage
Saying Marxism is a science is preface. Add organized sarcasm and we come closer to mocking not so much intimate feelings associated with worldly illusions but their form in a particular perishable world. It aims to give new form to certain aspirations, the better to regenerate them. Yet if Marxist movements are to be effective, they must create new tastes and a new language for struggles to be born. Sarcasm then is about what outrages our sense of what should be.


Race and the Logic of Capital

Alan Wald Solidarity
Shortly before his death, James Baldwin wrote that in the U.S., “White is a metaphor for power,” an observation that is deep background for much of the discussion in the masterly book under review, where race and class are intertwined, yet surface differences are used to split the labor force and maintain capital’s hegemony. The book can usefully inform debate on race and class and aid in reconstructing a revolutionary project in the context of Trumpworld.

Cold War Revisionism Revisited

Harry Targ Monthly Review
In the early years of the Cold War, the academic study of international relations was an ideological tool serving the foreign policy of the United States and its allies. But in the 1960s, a new generation of scholars began to challenge the reigning orthodoxy.

Protagonism and Productivity

Michael A. Lebowitz Monthly Review
To build the new socialist society, it is necessary to develop new, socialist concepts.8 So, let me end by paraphrasing Che from his Man and Socialism in Cuba: the pipe dream that socialism can be achieved through capitalist accounting and capitalist concepts of efficiency can lead into a blind alley. And you wind up there after having travelled a long distance with many crossroads, and it is hard to figure out just where you took the wrong turn.

The Russians Are Coming, Again

Jeremy Kuzmarov and John Marciano Monthly Review
Americans are again being warned daily of the Russian menace, with persistent accusations of Russian aggression, lies, violations of international law, and cyberattacks on U.S. elections, as reported in leading liberal outlets like the New York Times and the Washington Post.


The Revolutionary Lives of James and Grace Lee Boggs

Ibram X. Kendi Black Perspectives
This book is an important addition to U.S. left wing movement history. This brief author interview appears on the blog of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS). James and Grace Lee Boggs were independent Marxist revolutionaries who worked in Detroit beginning in the 1940s, were among the earliest theorists of 1960s Black Power, and were influential in the revolutionary movement in Detroit as well as nationally and internationally.


Bolsheviks and Beyond: Revisiting John Reed's "Ten Days that Shook the World"

Michael Hirsch Democratic Left
On the centennial of the Russian Revolution, John Reed's first-hand look at the uprising of workers, peasants, soldiers and sailors is fit reading about a mass movement that overthrew the old aristocracy and then the bourgeois class itself. An exposition on ordinary people making history for themselves, the book is a gripping account of events in Petrograd, when Lenin and the Bolsheviks lead the various workers councils in finally seizing state power.
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