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The Healthy D.C. Economy is Leaving Behind Longtime Black Residents, New Study Finds

Perry Stein Washington Post
Half of all new jobs in Washington, DC will require at least a bachelor's degree, although only 12.3 percent of Black residents in 2014 had graduated from college. And, now that wealthier residents have moved back to cities, rent increases have left longtime residents unable to afford their homes.

books

Taking It to the Street

Jill Leovy American Scholar
In this review, Jill Leovy looks at two new studies of contemporary US poverty.

books

Matthew Desmond's `Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City'

Barbara Ehrenreich New York Times Book Review
Matthew Desmond is an academic who teaches at Harvard - a sociologist or, you could say, an ethnographer. But I would like to claim him as a journalist, and one who has set a new standard for reporting on poverty. In Milwaukee, he moved into a trailer park and then to a rooming house on the -poverty-stricken North Side and diligently took notes on the lives of people who pay 70 to 80 percent of their incomes for homes that are unfit for human habitation.
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