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Why Paul Robeson’s Voice Still Rings True Today

Tayo Aluko The Progressive
Those who desecrated the Capitol in January called themselves patriots. Millions supported them, including members of both Houses. This again reminded one of Robeson, because seventy-two years earlier, another angry mob might well have lynched him.

Remembering Tulsa

Tim Madigan; Photographs by Zora J. Murff with Trent Bozeman Smithsonian Magazine
American Terror. A century ago in Tulsa, a murderous mob attacked the most prosperous black community in the nation.

Don't Defend Democracy With Half-Truths About the Past

Brook Thomas History News Network
Myths about the founders and President Grant cannot restore legitimacy to a democracy in the wake of a second presidential impeachment and acquittal and facing competing demands to unify the country, rebuild the economy and address racial injustice.

Jacob Lawrence Went Beyond the Constraints of a Segregated Art World

Rachel Himes Jacobin
Jacob Lawrence was one of twentieth-century America’s most celebrated black artists. In Struggle, his series of paintings on the American Revolution, he opened up new territory in American history- beyond had become synonymous with black art.

books

This Guilty Land

Eric Foner London Review of Books
A leading historian of 19th century US history reviews two recent books on Lincoln and John Brown, charting the background to the Civil War and its lingering heritage today.

For Hope, Look South

Nelson Perez-Olney The Stansbury Forum
man standing on Pettus Bridge Every part of this country, north south east and west, owes its origin and wealth to our “peculiar institution” as well as other less notorious programs of government sanctioned/ignored exploitation and murder of the poor, immigrants, women.
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