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Folk Witness

John T. Edge Oxford American
What draws us to seek pleasure and solace in places often referred to as joints and shacks? Is this about time travel? Are they portals to a Southern past? Is it rooted in rooted in class difference, and a want to span that chasm?

food

The Still-Evolving History of Tacos de Canasta

Michael Snyder Saveur Magazine
Tacos de canasta are wrapped in distinctive sky-blue plastic Tacos de Canasta are sold everywhere in Mexico, created primarily by the drift of population between town and country that defined Mexico City in the 20th century. They are not merely a way of celebrating Mexico’s singular culinary heritage, but also a way of staking a claim to part of that heritage

food

Soak the Beans: India, Puerto Rico and Austria mingle in a Georgia kitchen

Anjali Enjeti Southern Foodways Alliance
Cooking their dishes can connect us to our grandparents My childhood dinners were an international smorgasbord. The scents of these dishes beckoned me from my bedroom to the kitchen, where I’d watch my mother in the final stages of sprinkling garnish. Now, in my forties, I feel I owe it to my children, to the generations that follow, to fully and actively educate myself in my family’s food.

food

West Africa steams over jollof rice war

Anisa Subedar & Iqbal Ahmed BBC
Jollof rice is a dish hugely popular in countries such as Senegal, Ghana, Nigeria, Gambia, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Cameroon. Somehow, Mark Zuckerberg got into the fray about which country's recipe is best.

food

Maamoul: An Ancient Cookie That Ushers In Easter And Eid In The Middle East

Amy E. Robertson NPR Foodways
In the Levantine region of the Middle East, the Easter or Eid holidays are marked by a shortbread cookie called maamoul. Stuffed with date paste or chopped walnuts or pistachios, and dusted with powdered sugar, these buttery cookies are the perfect reward after a month of fasting during Ramadan or Lent.

food

THE STATE OF SOUL FOOD IN AMERICA

ADRIAN MILLER First We Feast
The flourishing of soul food’s sub-genres has been fun to watch (and eat), but it has also meant that fewer African-American chefs are embracing traditional soul food. Some side-step the cuisine in order to avoid being pigeon-holed as a “soul-food cooks,” while others follow their passions for other flavors.
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