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Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom

Joshua A Claybourn Compulsive Reader
Reviewer Claybourn says this new biography is likely to become the definitive one of the great 19th Century leader of the African American freedom struggle and champion of democracy.

22 Million Reasons Black America Doesn’t Trust Banks

Marcus Anthony Hunter The Conversation
By 1871, Congress had authorized the bank to provide mortgages and business loans. Such mortgages and loans, however, were usually given to whites, creating a financial paradox -— a bank using the savings and income of black depositors to advance the economic fortunes of whites who had at their disposal mainstream banks that excluded blacks.

What to Black People is the National Anthem?

Lisa Brock Praxis Center
On Veterans day, the idea of the veteran was touted by POTUS and his supporters as an emotional counterweight to the protesting athletes. Dr. Lisa Brock reminds us that African Americans have historically had a conflictual relationship with US militarism.

books

Frederick Douglass's `Amazing Job' Started With His First Book

Ron Charles Washington Post
Forget that Donald Trump said something commendable about Frederick Douglass--perhaps a first for Trump--the autobiography of Douglass is a classic, and reading it again is a fit way to commemorate Black History Month. Washington Post book editor Ron Charles gives ample reason why.

Friday Nite Videos -- Fourth of July, 2015

Portside
Which America should we recall on the Fourth of July? The "all men are created equal" of the Declaration of Independence or the gross inequalities by race, class and gender, the crying disparities of wealth, voice and security in real life? Both. Because the lofty declaration is more than a platitude and a snare; it has also always been a goal and a call to strive "to finish the work we are in." Lefty alternatives for the Fourth: songs, thoughts, a little inspiration.

James Earl Jones Reads Frederick Douglass

James Earl Jones (introduced by Howard Zinn) reads excerpts from anti-slavery crusader Frederick Douglass' speech, 'The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro' (July 5, 1852).
 

Rethinking the Fourth of July

Bill Begelow Huffington Post
Frederick Douglass, July 5, 1852 said, "What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July? I answer; a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim. To him, your celebration is a sham; your boasted liberty, an unholy license..." This July 4, our nation plans the massive deportation of thousands of immigrant children. Democracy - Born in slavery and denying a home to today's impoverished.

Of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, John Lewis, Jimmie Lee Jackson, Fannie Lou Hamer, Rosa Parks, Coretta Scott King, Herbert Marcuse, Joseph Weydemeyer, Karl Marx, Frederick Douglass, Jim Crow, the New Jim Crow, and the New New Jim Crow:Shelby County v. Holder

Mark S. Mishler Portside
Ginsburg attacks the ahistorical character of the majority decision. Quoting Shakespeare, she notes that the majority "ignores that `what's past is prologue'". What a profound observation, `the past is prologue'. It neatly, and with a literary flourish, sums up the deep defect with the Court's decision, its deliberate ignoring of both the contemporary ramifications of historical racism in this country as well as its current vitality.
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