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Depression Era Co-ops

Jonathan Rowe Yes Magazine
What History Books Left Out About Depression Era Co-ops It would seem that a movement that provided livelihood for more than 300,000 people in California alone would merit discussion in the history books.

Are American Workers Really Allergic to Socialism?

Chris Wright History News Network
One of the most remarkable demonstrations of the deep-seated radicalism of “ordinary people” has been all but forgotten, even by historians: namely, the Workers’ Unemployment Insurance Bill.

books

The Black Cultural Front: Black Writers and Artists of the Depression Generation

John Woodford The Black Scholar, Vol. 43, Nbr. 3 - Fall 2013
Using original source material Brian Dolinar arrives at a different explanation of why the popular front of 30s and 40s broke up, than that of mainstream media of that time, and since. The key agents of disunity were not the Communists but the manifold assault by the rightwing establishment. The US ruling class used opinion-molding Red-scare and Red-baiting campaigns in the mass media and culture. A lesson for today with the re-growth of the radical right.

Bing Crosby: Buddy Can You Spare a Dime?

Lyrics by the incomparable Yip Harburg, music by Jay Gorney (1931).
 
They used to tell me I was building a dream
And so I followed the mob
When there was earth to plow or guns to bear
I was always there, right on the job
 
They used to tell me I was building a dream
With peace and glory ahead
Why should I be standing in line
Just waiting for bread?
 
Once I built a railroad, I made it run
Made it race against time
Once I built a railroad, now it's done
Brother, can you spare a dime?
 
Once I built a tower up to the sun
Brick and rivet and lime
Once I built a tower, now it's done
Brother, can you spare a dime?
 
Once in khaki suits, gee, we looked swell
Full of that Yankee Doodly Dum
Half a million boots went slogging through Hell
And I was the kid with the drum
 
Say, don't you remember? They called me 'Al'
It was 'Al' all the time
Why don't you remember? I'm your pal
Say buddy, can you spare a dime?
 
Once in khaki suits, ah, gee, we looked swell
Full of that Yankee Doodly Dum
Half a million boots went slogging through Hell
And I was the kid with the drum
 
Oh, say, don't you remember? They called me 'Al'
It was 'Al' all the time
Say, don't you remember? I'm your pal
Buddy, can you spare a dime?
 
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