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How Langston Hughes Brought His Radical Vision to the Novel

Angela Flournoy New York Times
In his famous essay “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain,” Hughes expresses fondness for “the low-down folks, the so-called common element.” Poor African-Americans made up a majority of the black population but were rarely depicted as fully realized characters in the serious literature of the day.

labor

Labor, Movement and Change

Gwen McKinney Huffpost
Trump is one of the manifestations of national discontent. To his slogan “Make America Great Again” my response – as a tribute to Labor and working people – draws from one of our truly great Americans, Langston Hughes, who proclaimed “Let America be America Again! Let it be the dream it used to be. Let it be the pioneer on the plain, seeking a home where he himself is free. (America never was America to me.)”

Friday Nite Videos | June 30, 2017

Portside
The Hamilton Mixtape: Immigrants (We Get The Job Done), Vaccines (John Oliver), Let America Be America Again, Cancion del Mariachi | Maan Hamadeh, From Russia, With an Apology for Trump (Stephen Colbert)

Tidbits - March 24, 2016 - Reader Comments: Brussels Attacks; Zika Virus; Bayard Rustin; Trump's Ideology and Working-Class Appeal; Labor Notes Conference; Abraham Lincoln Brigade; and more

Portside
Reader Comments: Zika Virus-Puerto Rico; Brussels Attacks; Elizabeth Warren; Bayard Rustin - from those who knew him; Letters from Langston; Dr. Quentin Young; Trump's Ideology of Violence and Working-Class Appeal; How Black Youth Helped Unseat Anita Alvarez; Demonstrating Against Trump; Future of Education-Colleges as Investments; Community Colleges; Announcements: Labor Notes Conference; Webinar: TPP is a feminist issue; 80th Annual Celebration Abraham Lincoln Brigade

books

Letters from Langston: From the Harlem Renaissance to the Red Scare and Beyond

JJ Johnson Portside
"Letters from Langston: From the Harlem Renaissance to the Red Scare and Beyond" is both a compilation of an intriguing exchange of letters among five heroic African Americans and a loving tribute to the letter writers from the daughters of four of the writers: Evelyn Louise Crawford and MaryLouise Patterson.

Raisin’ Cane: A Harlem Renaissance Odyssey

Bev Fleisher DC Metro Theater Arts
In the American Black community, during the years leading up to the Harlem Renaissance, there was a sense of building artistic expression. Outlets and avenues for its poets, musicians, novelists, artists, and actors were few. But in 1918, as the first great World War concluded and thousands of African-American soldiers returned home victorious, this mountain of artistic expression was now ready to explode.

Kids Who Die

Frank Chi and Terrance Green; Heidi Beirich Color of Change -- Southern Poverty Law Center
As we approach the one year mark of the tragic police killing of Michael Brown and the Ferguson uprising that sparked a growing movement, Hughes' words remain painfully true today. Meanwhile, The hate site Stormfront and other racist groups have raked in hundreds of new members and tens of thousands of dollars since Dylann Storm Roof’s brutal June 17 killing spree in Charleston, S.C.

Celebrating Progressive Patriotism; Top Ten July 4th Songs

Peter Drier, Richard Flacks and Peter Rothberg
To some, patriotism means "my country -- right or wrong." To others, it means loyalty to a set of principles, and thus requires dissent and criticism when those in power violate those standards. Not enough Americans are aware that much of what we consider our patriotic culture, especially our iconic music, was created by artists and writers of decidedly left-wing sympathies.
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