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poetry

Paper Crowns

Joanne Diaz American Poetry Review
“All blindness and much worse,” writes Illinois poet Joanne Diaz of the invisibility of Black life to oblivious white people.

books

A Hope Manifesto for Times of Resistance

Keli Goff Los Angeles Review of Books
Mandela was not just "a brilliant political tactician and legal mind, but also an exquisite writer," says reviewer Goff. These letters give us a man of high ideals whose "fight for survival" in prison adds Goff, "would have broken many of us."

books

Remembering Philip Roth (1933-2018)

Nathaniel Rich The New York Review of Books
An homage to the esteemed late novelist and nonfiction writer Philip Roth, who died on May 22, leaving a legacy of thick description of an American culture where, in Roth's ironic words, “everything goes and nothing matters."

books

Reading Irish Revolutionary James Connolly

Kevin Crane Counterfire
Considered Ireland's key revolutionary, James Connolly was active in workers' movements in the United States, Scotland and Ireland. This collection reflects his struggles for an Ireland and a world free from militarism, injustice, and deprivation.

books

The Socialist Imperative from Gotha to Now

Kai-Li Cheng Marx & Philosophy Review of Books
Thinking about how the lessons of the 20th Century might inform a socialist vision for our times is the task the author of this book has set for himself. Reviewer Kai-Li Cheng offers an assessment.

food

The Surprisingly Long History of Racial Oppression in Coffeehouses: Centuries before two Black men were arrested at a Philadelphia Starbucks, capitalists met at coffee shops to profit from the transatlantic slave trade.

Tasha Williams Yes Magazine
Traders, bankers, and Lloyd’s merchants also met in coffeehouses in Bristol, England, to enrich themselves with profits from over 2,000 slave ships processed in that city Coffeehouses connected goods and capital streams with seekers, facilitating the very aspect of slavery that amplified capitalism. Enslaved peoples’ bodies were not only bought and sold, but made into part of the processes of of credit and finance.
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