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Tidbits – April 7, 2022 – Reader Comments: Ukraine War; Peace Movement; Starbucks; Supreme Court and Gerrymandering; Huge Union Win at MIT; Red Scare; Anti-Corporate Radio Is Everywhere; Labor Against War in Ukraine; Walden Bello; Announcements;

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Reader Comments: Ukraine War; Peace Movement; Starbucks; Supreme Court and Gerrymandering; Huge Union Win at MIT; Red Scare; Anti-Corporate Radio is Everywhere; Labor Against War in Ukraine; Walden Bello; Announcements; more...

We Are Long Overdue for a Paul Robeson Revival

Peter Dreier Los Angeles Review of Books
In the 1970s, Robeson’s admirers — boosted by the upsurge of black studies and black cultural projects, the waning of the Cold War — began to rehabilitate his reputation with various tributes, documentary films, books, concerts, exhibits, and a play

It’s Never ‘Just the Immigrants’

Harry Blain Foreign Policy in Focus
protest in front of White House in 1922 The targeting of immigrants is intimately linked to a long record of labor repression and civil liberties violations — which eventually target the native-born, too.

Walter O’Brien: The Man Who Never Returned

Peter Dreier and Jim Vrabel Jacobin
Most Americans know the song “MTA,” popularized by the Kingston Trio in 1959. It’s the one about a “man named Charlie” doomed to “ride forever ’neath the streets of Boston . . . the man who never returned.” What’s forgotten, however, is that the song was originally made for a left-wing political campaign. In 1949, the Boston People’s Artists wrote “MTA” for a left-wing candidate. The song became a hit — the man behind it disappeared.

The Actor and the Anarchist

Pauline Murphy Morning Star
When Irish left-wing labor leader James Larkin arrived in the United States he joined the Industrial Workers of the World (Wobblies) and the Socialist Party. A supporter of the Bolshevik Revolution, Larkin was arrested during the 1919 Red Scare and sentenced to hard labor at Sing Sing. There he was visited by Charlie Chaplin who described the prison as "grimly medieval," and wondered "what fiendish brain could conceive of building such horrors."
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